Differences Between The Great Awakening And The American Revolution

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The American Revolution marked a period of change in the thoughts and beliefs of the colonist. The roots of the Revolution began with a fundamental shift in the way the colonists viewed their place in the world in a political and religious manner. This type of change in religious and political thinking had occurred before throughout history. Each time this change in people’s fundamental thoughts and beliefs arose, it caused sweeping reforms in the places that it occurred. An example of this was the Enlightenment and The Great Awakening period that transpired prior to the American Revolution. Although these periods were very different in what they accomplished, they both challenged society’s view of their situations in life. Their biggest …show more content…
The thinkers involved in the movement were interested in focusing on reasoning rather than blind faith and the establishment of an authoritative system no longer rooted in the religious ideals of the Roman Catholic Church. The Glorious Revolution of 1688 was a direct result of the change in political thinking caused by the Enlightenment. The ascension of William III and Mary II led to a shift in England from an absolute monarchy into a constitutional monarchy. The change in political and religious thinking led to a period of religious tolerance, which paved the way for the Great Awakening. This religious restoration challenged the way people taught and gave them freedom to voice and act upon their views. The Great Awakening led to the unification of the colonies with its acceptance of different religious practices and teachings. The Enlightenment and Great Awakening period of the eighteen century influenced the colonists and led to The American Revolution. The Enlightenment challenged individuals to question their views, The Glorious Revolution changed political actions, and The Great Awakening promoted religious

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