Differences Between Soviet Russia And Nazi Germany

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In two totalitarian societies, Soviet Russia and Nazi Germany, politics and the arts were prevalent. In both countries, a strict one-ruler government was formed in the 20th century. However, through these dictatorships, citizens in each country were able to connect to the history of dance. Dancing helped to entertain and also advanced political propaganda. While dance was famous in Russia under Lenin and Stalin, dance in Germany was not as revered as Russian ballet, especially during the time of Hitler’s rule. Although these two countries may not seem to own the same style of dance, both countries were able to benefit from dance politically. Soviet Russia and Nazi Germany demonstrate how dance was utilized in totalitarian societies, for political …show more content…
The company is now known as the Mariinsky Ballet, and has been since the end of Soviet rule. Originally known as “the Imperial Russian Ballet – the company was born under the command of Catherine the Great.” The ballet company possessed some artistic freedom under Soviet rule but still had to follow particular guidelines. In order to maintain multiple dancers, the theater would recruit children from all over Russia and bring them back to the theater to be trained. They were then able to “…spread and evaluate the quality of art.” As a result of this, the political message as well as artistic message would have a better opportunity of being spread throughout Russia. The ballerinas “…reigned supreme on this stage, among them Mathilde Kschessinska, Anna Pavlova, Vaslav Nijinsky, Galina Ulanova, Rudolf Nureyev and Mikhail Baryshnikov.” These dancers remained loyal to ballet, and some of the dancers were a part of the Ballets Russes, which is known as “…the most renowned company in the history of ballet.” After the 1920s, under Stalin’s rule, Russia 's ballet relapsed to the conventional forms of a more traditional ballet as exemplified by Marius Petipa. Petipa was known for creating challenging routines for dancers to perform. Petpia is famous for the exacting way he ran his classes and for the demanding technique he used in each dance. As a …show more content…
In 1877, Swan Lake was performed for public audiences at the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow. The production began in March “as a benefit performance for ballerina Pelageya “Polina” Karpakova, who performed the role of Odette.” Odette is the main ballerina in Swan Lake, and the story revolves around this particular character. This beautiful piece is “a classic, treasured ballet which tells the story of a prince who encounters a beautiful swan transformed from a human princess by a wicked sorcerer’s curse.” The ballet is divided into three acts with four scenes in total. The source of the ballet is not certain but it is stated that “Fyodor Lopukhov (chief choreographer of the Mariinsky Theatre) called Swan Lake a “national ballet” because of swans “who originate from Russian lyrically romantic sources” and from Slavonic ring dances.” The thought was that Russia was the epitome of these two sources, swans and love. Conversely, Swan Lake was not as well received then as it is in today’s society, in fact the ballet was not a great success. The piece was criticized for being too German-like and the people disliked Tchaikovsky’s musical score for the ballet saying it sounded too much like Wagner, a German composer. A critic name Tyler Grant has called “the premiere “utter hogwash” with choreography “unimaginative and altogether unmemorable.” Over the years, Swan Lake has enjoyed increasing popularity in

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