Socrates Opinions In Plato's Crito

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Socrates and Crito have differing opinions on most things in life, especially in regards to their ideas about justice and the opinion of the many. This is evident in Plato’s Crito, a dialogue between Socrates and his friend, Crito, in the final days of Socrates’ life. Crito tries his hardest to convince Socrates that it is in his best interest to flee from jail, while Socrates attempts to do the opposite. Crito’s last words in the dialogue are “I have nothing to say” because Crito is defeated. His and Socrates’ opinions and intellects are so vastly different that they cannot see eye to eye; therefore, Crito cannot fully understand Socrates and has nothing to say. Socrates and Crito are exceedingly different people in their values and intellects. …show more content…
Crito attempts to convince Socrates that it is in his best interest to flee from jail because to Crito, death is the worst punishment (. Socrates, however, cares about the soul over the body, and believes that only he can harm his soul (Lecture October 12). Money is not foreign to Crito, and he makes it known that it wouldn’t require “much money” to bribe Socrates’ way out of prison (45a7). Crito is willing and able to use his money for what he believes is just, which, to him, is making sure Socrates flees from jail. Crito makes it known that he has “guest-friends” that “will regard [Socrates] as important and offer [him] safety” (45c3-4). Crito argues that Socrates will be “betraying himself” if he stays in jail (45c7). Even further, Crito claims that Socrates will “leave and abandon” his sons, which, to Crito, seems like “the most easygoing course” (45d1,45d7-8). All of these arguments build up to Crito’s BIGGEST ?????, the opinion of the …show more content…
He uses the position of the laws to get through to Crito. Crito and the laws are very similar because they both want others to listen and obey them without discussion. While Crito tries to convince Socrates to flee, he states, “Socrates, obey me and in no way do otherwise” (46a9). Crito believes his words, like the laws, do not need to be discussed. The laws are determined by the many, therefore, they reflect the opinion of the many--something that Crito respects. Unlike Crito, Socrates disregards the opinion of the many. Since the laws reflect the opinion of the many, there is no way that Socrates can truly respect the laws (Lecture October 12). Socrates uses this fundamental difference between the two of them to his advantage, knowing that philosophical discussion and reasoning will not be effective in convincing Crito that he should stay in jail because philosophy is very foreign to him. Therefore, he uses the perspective of the laws to show Crito that he should not flee, since Crito relates much more with laws than he does with philosophy. Crito has been a friend of Socrates for a long time, so Socrates is aware that Crito and the laws are very similar in character and in thought. The laws may not always voice the opinion of Socrates, but he is aware that Crito will be more likely convinced by the laws due to who he is as a

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