Differences Of Interactions Between Rome And Greece

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When people think of the Romans and the Greeks, they only remember a couple things, like the fall of the Roman Empire and Sparta, but they never remember what else was going on at the same time.At the same time as Rome and Greece another empire came into view, this empire was known as the Persian Empire. They wanted complete control of the land belonging to the Romans and the Greeks, who were not willing to give it up because they wanted to self rule. The Persians then attempted many different types of interactions with the Romans and the Greeks. Some ways they interacted with each other included: recruiting foot soldiers from Greece, waging war against Greece, creation of the Silk road, and by attempting to conquer Rome twice. One way the …show more content…
When the Chinese first went through Persia, they did not achieve any alliances with Persia but rather created the Silk Road. The Silk Road was the main trade route for Asia, and even led to more communication between the Persians and the Romans. This communication, however, was not that major and was simply trading between the two countries. Since the Silk road was the main trade route, Persia and Rome interacted in some shape or form. Some possible ways they could have interacted using the Silk road are: trade routes, thievery, and avoidance. Trade routes are a way of interaction because the Silk road was used for trading and they both used it, and more than likely traded with each other even though they disliked each other. This interaction is likely because they probably needed something that the other one had. Another possible interaction on the Silk road between Rome and Persia is thievery, if they didn’t trade with each other they may have stolen from each other. Also, Persia was known for wanting dominance over Rome and may have used the Silk road negotiations to their advantage as a way to develop insight on Rome and their weaknesses.The third way the Romans and Persians could have interacted is avoidance. Avoidance is actually an interaction because typically when people try to avoid each other, they often end up meeting in random places that they think the other won’t go …show more content…
The Persians recruited foot soldiers from Greece to benefit their, the Persian’s, navy. Another way they interacted with Greece was to wage war against them, as they were a threat to the Persian Empire.The first way they interacted with the Romans was by the Silk Road and Chinese diplomacy missions. The second way they interacted with Rome was by attempting to conquer them twice. Is there more interactions buried deep within

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