Socrates Expectations Of A Perfect Society

Superior Essays
Since the creation of the first culture, there has been a mutually agreed upon set of expectations for the people in that culture to abide by. Consequently, if a person did not abide by these standards, then they would have not been welcome to participate within that society. Throughout time, there have been several different cultures that have similarities and differences, as far as standards of living within the community. By looking at different pieces of literature, written in different time periods and locations, differences and similarities can be drawn from the expectations of cultures for their citizens. To analyze these expectations, The Republic, The Rule of St. Benedict, and The Handbook for William are three different works, written …show more content…
In this account, Plato records Socrates’s thoughts about justice and the ideal state. In this work, Socrates describes the perfect society and how he thinks it would work. Socrates contemplates the roles of ordinary citizens and the philosophers in a perfect state. Furthermore, he lays out some of the most important characteristics that would make a citizen a vital part of the society. Socrates places wisdom, justice, and goodness above all other virtues, and he repeatedly comes back to these themes. When outlining his ideal state, Socrates states that if ordered correctly than the state be considered perfect. Socrates clearly states that “being perfect, is therefore wise and valiant and temperate and just” (Plato 97). Socrates could only find the first two virtues in a small percentage of the population, in the rulers and military. Socrates felt that it didn’t matter if these virtues were found in other individuals, even though these virtues are found in his perception of a just man. To Socrates, temperance could be found in every member of his just society. He expected the people to accept authority. A citizen was either a leaders or a follower, there is not much they could do to change this. This characteristic ties into the last important characteristic, justice. Every citizen does what they are supposed to, doing everything to the best of their ability. …show more content…
In her work, The Handbook for William, Dhuoda was trying to write to her son, William, in about c.841 AD. Dhuoda is writing this handbook to help morally guide her son through life. She hopes that her sons will thrive in life, and always put God first. One of the main lessons that Dhuoda want to teach her son is to revere all authority figures. She wants him to obey God first, then his father, and then his king and other powerful figures, so that he may succeed in this life and the next. Dhuoda says that “many others who have been obedient to God and mindful of the commands of a devoted father have been honored and respected in the secular world and have safely reached that heavenly reward” (Dhuoda 25). Dhuoda is constantly telling her son to strive to be virtuous in every respect. She is constantly quoting scripture to give instruction for William to, “avoid iniquity, love fairness, follow justice, and fear to hear the sayings of the psalmist” (Dhuoda 58). Overall, Dhuoda is telling her son to be righteous in every respect, so that he will please everyone, but especially

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