Difference Between Naturalization And Sedition Act

Good Essays
In 1790 the first naturalization law formed was known as the Nationality Act. This act “restricted citizenship to “any alien, being free white person” who had been in the U.S. for two years” (Densho Encyclopedia). It excluded indentured servants, slaves, and most women, but would later be applied to African Americans, and Asian immigrants on regards to them not being eligible to be naturalized. It is from the Nationality Act that the Naturalization Act of 1798 was founded. The Naturalization Act of 1790 allowed immigrants to become residents after two years of good conduct and behavior and a vow to advocate the Constitution. This also meant that they had to renounce all allegiance to any foreign country, state or province. This also allowed …show more content…
The Naturalization Act was a right directly stated that Congress had in the Constitution, while the Sedition Act directly violated the First Amendment. The Alien Friends Act was unlike the Naturalization and Sedition Act because the United States was still young and Congress would have to in essence start fresh in its decision. It would look to the Constitution for guidance, but this was an issue not overtly said, which is why the act was altered many times, “Throughout the month of May, the Senate debated the resulting bill and several amendments to it. At one extreme, it was proposed that the scope of the president’s power be enlarged to include the ability to expel any alien who had been imprisoned for ‘speaking, writing, or printing’ dangerous ideas. At the other, it was proposed that the president be reined in by requiring him to provide the basis for any deportation and deposit a record of his actions in the office of the secretary of state for congress’s perusal” (Berkin 205). On June 21st, due to a majority of seats in Congress being filled by Federalists, the Alien Friends Act was passed. It gave the president authority to order any aliens he viewed as a threat to the peace and safety of the United States, or exhibited any treasonous actions to the U.S. government to leave the United States (Berkin 208). The Federalists defended this Act by stating that the government had the right to provide for the common defense and promote the general welfare, according to the Constitution. The opposition would dispute using states rights which highlights a much larger issue in American

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    The Whiskey Revolution

    • 1277 Words
    • 6 Pages

    If President John Adams thought there was an immigrant that was a threat to national security, he was able to deport them. The years for becoming a citizen was also changed. It was now in 5 to 14 years that an immigrant could be a citizen. In the Sedition Act, Adams had the power to put someone in jail, if they said anything that was against the government and war effort. This act was primarily against the Jeffersons Democratic- Republicans and newspaper editors who opposed the…

    • 1277 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    England had even taken away a legislator from one of the colonies, and had diverted all colonial commerce to England. The King had even alternated his given charters governments, restricting the colonists’ rights even more. As more colonies began to realize these facts, they moved even closer towards wanting independence, and the Declaration of Independence was signed a year later (5). In Thomas Paine’s Common Sense, he plainly states that America should be independent from England. Because America can take care of itself, they need not be under the jurisdiction of England.…

    • 1119 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    “That it shall be lawful for the President of the United States… to order all such aliens as he shall judge dangerous to the peace and safety of the United States…” If an alien was deported, they would need the permission of the President to reenter the country. The Alien Enemies Act was the third part of Alien and Sedition…

    • 1029 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Amy Tan Two Kinds Theme

    • 1492 Words
    • 6 Pages

    It was passed by Congress and signed by President Chester A. Arthur. It was the first major law restricting immigration into the United States. It was the first major law restricting immigration into the United States. “For the first time, Federal law proscribed entry of an ethnic working group on the premise that it endangered the good order of certain localities” (Chinese Exclusion Act). The Chinese Exclusion Act required that the few non-laborers who sought entry to obtain certification from the Chinese government, were still qualified to immigrate.…

    • 1492 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Thomas Jefferson & the Alien and Sedition Acts In June and July of 1798 conservative Federalists pushed a series of repressive measures through Congress. They were known as the Alien and Sedition Acts. As it is stated in American Destiny: Narrative of a Nation, “the Alien Enemies Act gave the president the power to arrest or expel aliens in time of ‘declared war.’ ” The Alien Act also gave the president the ability to expel all aliens that he thought were “dangerous to the peace and safety of the United States.” The text also states that “the Sedition Act made it a crime ‘to impede the operation of any law’ and made it illegal to publish any ‘false, scandalous, and malicious’ criticism of high government officials.” Thomas Jefferson did not…

    • 1081 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Lastly, should the Supreme Court interpret the Constitution in such a way that does not sit favorably with the members of Congress, Congress can at all times draft new laws, as well as amend the Constitution, effectively circumventing the Court’s previous decision (The Power of the Federal Courts). As such, it is evident that the Courts influence in policymaking is considerably limited to that of Congress, the President, and the Bureaucracy. Therefore, the Supreme Court’s principal purpose in the policymaking process is simply to exercise judicial review, and evaluate the constitutional questions arising out of the cases brought before the…

    • 1033 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In one of his first demonstrations in office, Taft required an exceptional session of Congress to change levy law through decreased rates. Among the huge bits of enactment went by Congress amid Taft 's administration was the Mann-Elkins Act of 1910, engaging the Interstate Commerce Commission to suspend railroad rate climbs and to set rates. The demonstration also extended the ICC 's ward to cover phones, broadcasts, and radio. Taft also put 35,000 postmasters and 20,000 talented specialists in the Navy under common administration assurance. However, the Department of Commerce and Labor was isolated into two bureau divisions with Taft 's endorsement.…

    • 835 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Moving forward under the shadow of President Obama’s recent executive order to grant amnesty to more than four million immigrants, The Editorial Board’s article in the New York Times, “The Scrambled States of Immigration” examines our nations stance on immigration reform. Highlighting just how close the nation is to a breaking point, we see that rather than unity, there is disunity among the states, even though all know reform needs to be put in place in some form or fashion. Whether it will eventually be pro-immigrant or anti-immigrant, under the Lockeian view, illegal immigrants should not be granted amnesty under President Obama’s orders at all. Yet because of laws and programs such as mandatory public education, and Obamacare, it is clear…

    • 1598 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Their original purpose was to explain the laws and determine if they were constitutional, nowhere in their job description does it say they are allowed to create laws. Through cases like Brown vs Board, Roe vs. Wade, and this upcoming same-sex marriage case, it is evident the Supreme Court has overstepped its boundaries. Thankfully there are documents like the Federalist paper 78 and Antifederalist paper 78-79 that offer a framework and even suggestions to an all too powerful court system. If the nation would follow what the framers had intended, the future they had planned would be one much brighter than the one America is living in today. The antifederalists were afraid of what is happening today and left many recommendations that should be put in place such as an authoritative body to keep the judicial branch in check.…

    • 1523 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Bill of Rights are amendments as well because it was not initially stated within the original Constitution. Another difference is that the Bill of Rights are only the first ten amendments of the Constitution. Modernly, amendments are proposed, revised and/or changed just to be voted on in order to make the Constitution more functional for society while the Bill of Rights are less likely to seek alterations. There are many more amendments including, but not limited to the Bill of Rights. The other amendments do not just dictate individual freedom, but address national issues like the 26th Amendment.…

    • 1064 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays