Difference Between Sociology And Theoretical Approaches

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Understanding Sociological Perspectives and Theoretical Approaches From society to society across the globe, ideologies and ways of life differ. Though customs are unique to different cultures, there are also similarities which link them. The underlying cause of this phenomenon can be given responsibility to sociological perspectives and theories. Sociological perspectives and theoretical approaches are what make up the similarities, differences, and connection between cultures which produces an effect on these societies as well as the individual. There are three theoretical approaches in sociology. The first one of these approaches is the Structural-Functional Approach and it focuses on seeing society as interconnected. It relies on …show more content…
The Gender-Conflict Theory goes hand in hand with feminism. Women have only recently been given the right vote and other rights in Western society. Even though women as seen as equal in the law, there are many things women face that men do not have to face in terms of inequality and opportunity. This theory also includes the contributions of women in sociology, Jane Addams being one of them. She helped establish a home which assisted immigrant families, known as the Hull House. (Macionis 16) The second theory underneath the Social-Conflict Approach is the Race-Conflict Theory. This theory embodies the same ideas of the Gender-Conflict Theory, except this one is focused on race rather than gender, pointing out the disadvantages people of color face in society. This theory also takes the contributions of people of color into account. One of these people happens to be William Edward Burghardt Du Bois. He was a man of color who founded the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory. (Macionis …show more content…
According to Macinonis, in terms of this aspect, “sociologists look for general patterns in the behavior of particular people” (3). Although people may believe they are making their own choices, society is actually heavily influencing those choices. The social class a person is in, the race or gender of a person will affect their decision making. An example of this is how in 1976, Lillian Rubin found that women of a higher social class had different expectations for their ideal significant other than those of women of a lower social class. The women in the higher social class wanted their significant other to be sensitive and open about their feelings. The women in the lower social class looked for men who were not violent, who could hold steady jobs, and were not heavy drinkers. (Macinonis 3-4) Seeing the Strange in the Familiar is the second aspect underneath the sociological perspective. This aspect shows us that we are likely to see things from our sole point of view. We do not realize that we are making decisions and assumptions from bias as we are normally making said decisions and assumptions through what we see. Seeing the Strange in the Familiar is taking a step back and attempt to see things through others point of view. (Macinonis

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