Difference Between Single And Dual Parenting

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In the 1950’s the divorce rate was roughly 14%. Since then the divorce rate in the U.S has slowly risen and now it has reached to 50%. There are significantly huge differences between single and dual parenting. One of the biggest differences is economical. Households with children reported an average yearly income of $57,100. Single parent average income is $29, 000. The expenses are more than the income of a single parent. The stress and pressure on raising the children is another difference between single and dual parenting. In a ‘nuclear’ family, parents share the responsibilities of the house and kids. Single parents do not have that option. All of those differences have a great impact on how children are raised and the effect it will …show more content…
They have to work to provide the basic needs for their children. After work you may want to rest, but being a single parent right after work you may have to pick up the children from their after school activities, get home cook and do the endless chores in the household. Whereas in a dual parent household the chores and responsibilities may be divided between the two so neither of them are doing too much work. Dual parents have the opportunity to rest and have a break. Single parents do not have that option as often. The stress not only have an effect on the parent, but as well on their children. Noticing that their parents are stressing about the household can lead to lack of communication. Children may sometimes feel that if they share their problems with their parents may be causing more stress. This can lead them not to have an adult for when they need advice which can lead to make poor choices. Ultimately the lack of financial support and the stress they watch their parents go through have a great effect on their …show more content…
According to a study at Cornell University, positive parenting did not show any negative impact on the social and educational development of their children. Children in single parent families also tend to have strong responsibilities skills. Usually the older child tends to take care of their younger siblings, they often times form closer bonds with their younger siblings as well as their parents because they are closely depending on each other. They may also form closer bonds with extended family members or family friends. The article in American Prospect states, “Parents contemplating divorce need to be informed about the risks to their children if their marriage breaks up” (McLanahan). She states that divorcing is not the best solution and it should be prevented, however, in other opposing article which states that divorce may sometimes be the best solution both agree that in the end there are other factors that can contribute on how the child 's future will

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