Theories Of Terrorists

Great Essays
“The world is anarchic.” That is how realists may see the world and relations amongst state are only necessary in order to gain states’ own interests. They believe that states are competitive towards one another with the primary goal of gaining power. Their theory is often contradicting the theory of the liberalists and idealists, which believe in cooperation and the existences of mutual benefits. The realists believe that states are meant to struggle for power and act in a way to prioritize the nation’s interests. Apart from that, the realists also believe that states are the main actor and that sovereign states means the states that believe in the use of force thus making war and military involvement inevitable. There are many types of war …show more content…
Terrorists easily accept the phrase “one man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter.” They don’t usually see themselves as the evil side; they will always have ways to justify their actions. One of the example is Osama bin Laden's announcement of war on American engages in the 1990s originated from his conviction that the U.S. troops positioned in Saudi Arabia was planning to diminish the kind of Islamic state he believed ought to exist in the Arabian peninsula. They believe that their actions are just a more extreme way to get what the want and fight for their …show more content…
This made Al Qaeda’s name big when Osama bin Laden declared war against the hegemonic nation, the United States of America. Today, a new terrorist group of so-called freedom fighter started to emerge, they are The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), which is also translated as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria or ash-Sham referring to Greater Syria (ISIS) or as it calls itself the Islamic State (IS) nowadays, which was hardly accepted by non members.
The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS) was an alternative of al Qaeda in Iraq. Partnered Sunni volunteer armies and US troops crushed al Qaeda in Iraq amid the post-2006 "surge", however it didn't annihilate them. The US officer in Iraq, General Ray Odierno, portrayed the gathering in 2010 as a decrease yet "fundamentally the same." In 2011, the gathering rebooted. ISIS effectively liberated various detainees held by the Iraqi government and, gradually yet definitely, started reconstructing their quality. ISIS and al-Qaeda separated in February 2014. "Over the years, there have been many signs that the relationship between al Qaeda Central (AQC) and the group's strongest, most unruly franchise was strained," Barack Mendelsohn, a political researcher at Haverford College, said. Their relationship "had always been more a matter of mutual interests than of shared

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Human nature is flawed therefore when survival is the main goal of a state, conflict is inevitable because a state has no way of predicting the true intentions of another state. This is why it is necessary for a state to expand their power, in order to have enough power to defend themselves in the anarchic international system. Many of these ideas came from Thucydides’ writing about realism in the international system. In many of his texts he writes about how a state’s survival depends largely on their material capability and alliances. More specifically if a state is internally solid with a strong communal identity, this will then lead to domestic stability and more importantly a strong foundation in the international system.…

    • 1509 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    If it is necessary to bend or even break the rules of war to win, then they are excused in doing so. Like what was mentioned up above, Al-Qaeda follows Sunni tradition, as apart of Sunni tradition religion is a reasonable excuse of just cause in order to declare war. Also part of the Sunni tradition, anyone that does not follow the Islamic Sunni traditions is considered unclean and an infidel. (Just War or Just…

    • 1353 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Defeating Communism

    • 847 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Unfortunately, the United States indirectly caused the rise in Islamic terrorism by siding with the mujahedeen against the Soviets in Afghanistan and by continuously fighting the secular Saddam Hussein in the 1990’s. Once Arab nationalism lost its appeal, the new way to be “free from the West” became Islamic fundamentalism. While the real national interest of American security remained unchanged throughout the Cold War and into the 1990’s, American policy makers learned the dangers of focusing on only one enemy. Focusing all efforts against Communism allowed for the rise of Islamic fundamentalism, the new enemy of the United…

    • 847 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The author contends that President Bush provided numerous reasons to declare a war against Iraq such as, “Saddam was evil; United Nations resolutions must be enforced; the Iraqi people should be liberated” (1). However, he declared that some of these justifications were non existent and were just for Bush’s self-defense. He admits that President Bush insisted that Saddam was a tyrant who had an enormous stock of mass destruction weapons that could form a huge risk for Americans. The author points out “While self-defense is the classic instance of a just cause, the highly speculative nature of the president’s self-defense argument was a moral problem” (2). This idea indicates that many American imperialists pretend that they are trying to protect a certain area as a moral obligation but they actually utilize it for their…

    • 785 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    the article talks and demand a study to find out the main reason behind horrific terrorism attacks (9/11). This article is more persuasive than the former, because it provides some evidence and information to support the thesis. For example, "Why Al-qa 'idah needed to do this as no wise human brothers including Muslims and hurts anyone without any reason". (Afghan paper calls on USA to define what terrorism is, 2007, paragraph 3). there has to be a super power behind, who is funding terrorist and paying them under the table to commence such acts against entire world, "to achieve its strategic objectives ".…

    • 1272 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Iraq War Analysis

    • 2281 Words
    • 10 Pages

    Therefore, Taliban regime and Saddam Hussein must be overthrown to establish democratic states. Neo-conservatism also stress on hegemony and military tool. Thus, eliminating Saddam Hussein created more power to U.S in Middle East. To reach the victories, the military was the best solution. As in the case of Afghanistan, to deal with terrorism, the invasion must be launched.…

    • 2281 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Another way that may be the most effective is a plan for the Iraqi government to put an end to the influence of ISIS. Experts on the issue have determined that “ISIS still has a major weakness in that it remains largely rejected by Sunni public opinion in the Muslim world. This presents Iraqi prime minister Nouri al-Maliki with a chance to undermine them militarily; it also means he has an opportunity to win over Sunnis in the fight…

    • 1384 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The very first sentence in the books Executive Summary is “The situation in Iraq is grave and deteriorating.” (Page xiii), according to the books introduction the aim of The Iraq Study Group Report is to have both the U.S. and Iraq emerge stronger than before not as separate nations but as allies. The beginning of the report is nothing if not grim. Ever since Suddam Hussein’s regime was toppled multiple insurgencies formed. The main problem of which was that the insurgencies had no leader but instead were and are “a network of networks” (page 4). While they are all different and diverse it was strongly agreed they were a majority against the U.S. led coalition forces/occupation.…

    • 813 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In doing so, they evicted and destroyed a huge Iraqi mechanized army and shattered Saddam’s war making capability. Desert Storm ranks with some of the greatest annihilation battles in history, marking a milestone for the United States Army after a long rebuilding process from the Vietnam War. The product was the new AirLand doctrine, applied during Desert Storm, and emphasizing that decisive victory is reached only through maneuver on the operational level. However, post Desert Storm and the 9/11 attacks, the belief was that the future belongs to terrorists and not in state on state conflict. Therefore, United States policy began downsizing the Army in…

    • 2009 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    The Fight with ISIS “All wars have unintended consequences. No matter how cautious generals and political leaders are, war sets in motion waves of change that can alter the currents of history” (Tirman 45). The United States involved itself in an ongoing conflict that has spanned from Crusades to the colonization by the European powers. When the United States pulled out of Iraq in December 2011, a splinter group of Al qaeda headed by Abu Musab al Zarqawi attacked major Shia communities to ignite a sectarian war. Due to the Iraqi military inability to stop the violence, ISIS have spread in northern Iraq and Syria.…

    • 1894 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays