Kazimierz Ajdukiewicz's Theory Of Knowledge

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A person that appears to be smart or intelligent is said to possess knowledge. But what exactly is knowledge? Epistemology, also known as the theory of knowledge is by definition the science of cognition. The definition of cognition is the act or process of knowing; perception. The author Kazimierz Ajdukiewicz, dissects cognition into two parts being cognitive acts and cognitive results. The author then goes further in depth and defines cognitive acts as certain mental activities such as perception, remembering, judging, and further, such as reasoning, reflecting, inferring and so on. He then describes cognitive reasoning as an example of scientific assertions. Psychology is defined as the science of the mind or of mental states and processes. …show more content…
However the truth has a wide variety of interpretations and meanings; one way it was defined was when thought and reality are one in content and not the actual art of just thinking. After all the thought he came to the conclusion that the definition of the truth devoid of genuine content. Philosophers have a different take on the definition of the truth than psychologist. Philosopher rejects the idea and look for another definition because they feel it cannot be determined whether our thoughts agree with reality. To philosophers the thought of truth as the agreement of thought with reality should be given up as an unattainable idea and standard definition of the …show more content…
The coherence theory of truth defines truth as the agreement of thoughts among themselves. The details of this theory considers the final and irrevocable criteria that makes something true or false is in agreement with other assertions already accepted. Although experience seems to be the final step in confirming what is true or false, but according to Ajdukiewicz, there is a higher level to validate whether something is true or not being the criterion of agreement. Agreement with experience and internal harmony are not sufficient enough to be deemed the truth, there must be another component that would allow us to choose among various systems of consistent assertion which agree with the truth. Additional factor such as economic means and other mitigating factors are valuable in attempt to become aware of the guidelines that accept assertions of natural science independently of the definition of the

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