Prison Education And Recidivism

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Prison Education and Recidivism
Recidivism is the relapsing behavior of criminal activity after one is released from prison. Unemployment and countless of legal issues of crimes have been linked to recidivism. Many offenders are confined in the U.S prisons with the goal of a reconstructed life; however, a mass amount of these prisoners will be released with little to no options for employment. A criminal 's past education experience, correctional education experience, and the impact of the experience they took advantage of affects their options of future employment. Countless of prisons have experienced the effectiveness of correctional education programs in helping to reduce recidivism and improve postrelease employment outcomes. Though recidivism
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Integrating back into society can be very challenging for an individual who is coming out of prison. The label of a felony conviction on one’s record is often a major barrier to finding employment after prison. They must obtain vocational skills and education to successfully reintegrate back into the workforce. Formerly imprisoned individuals, on average, are less educated than the general population and many felons lack a high school diploma or GED certificate and the professional skills needed to succeed in the labor force (Davis), so some prisons offer basic programs for inmates that include adult basic education, vocational studies, and post-secondary education (Petty). Of the three, vocational studies appear to have the best results in getting inmates trained for jobs that are readily available upon release. Between these different programs, researchers discovered that criminals had a 28 percent higher chance of gaining post-release employment when they obtain vocational skills versus academic education (Petty). In a study carried out by the RAND Corporation under the auspices of the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Assistance, the corporation found that on average, inmates that participated in prison education programs had a 43 percent chance of returning to prison than those who did not (Petty). These particular programs give inmates …show more content…
Recidivism is a return to criminal behavior after release, and the effectiveness of corrections is usually measured by rates of recidivism. Recognized factors impact recidivism rates are: the socio economic status of the individual, the effectiveness of post release supervision, length of time imprisoned, the seriousness and severity crime convicted, access to information which varies in different states, and one’s educational achievements and levels (Esperain 5). Each year, more than 700,000 people are freed from prisons, but within three years of release, four out of ten of them end up back in correctional facilities because they’ve committed new crimes or violated the terms of their release (Davis). But educational interventions may have more profound social impacts to prevent misconducts from happening again. Attending classes has been associated with improved social interaction and communications in the prison population, and has reduced problems with repeating crimes according to an analysis by the Institute of Higher Education Policy (Chen).  But educational interventions may have more profound social impacts. This method of education can increase critical thinking by compelling imprisoned people to utilize their often prodigious street smarts, into more sophisticated forms such as occupational skills. Overall the regeneration of crime from

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