Difference Between Media And Media

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Merging the Gap Between Science and the Media Science has provided solutions to the most puzzling diseases in society, but more recently, a lurking illness resides in an unexpected area: the media. The advent of modern technology is, undoubtedly, a powerful and profound transformation for human civilization, and the media is a standing testament to technological feasibilities: information, news and social trends are now accessible to the public 24 hours a day. However, accessibility is not immune to susceptibility and malleability. Current evaluations of the media 's role in reporting scientific information reveal poor integrations of media and science. In most cases, scientific jargon and data can make communicating research to the public …show more content…
However, both the field of science and communications have undergone much change with technological advances, and since then, the media has presented its potential benefits and drawbacks for connecting public engagement in science. With the introduction of television and the internet, distribution of information is faster than ever, but what is often overlooked by speed is accuracy. These unexpected changes have affected the public’s understanding of science. Likewise, science journalism is now changing to accompany shifts in public tastes, relying on the internet as an outlet for science media. For example, today, with approximately “60% of Americans” reporting the Internet as their primary resource to “learn more about scientific issues,” there is a pressure for the media to entertain their readers while keeping their accuracy in check (Su et al. 598). While censuring the media would resolve some aspects of the growing problems, it would be more problematic than useful, injuring multiple democratic freedoms. This emphasizes the point that relationship between the media and science is improved on a voluntary basis, one that requires the media’s to understand its role in society …show more content…
Nevertheless, as suggested by Michael Dahlstrom from Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication, these “narratives are not subject to the same truth requirements as logical-scientific communication,” which forces some information to fit into the mold of the narrative than the facts (13617). For instance, eagerness to search for confirmation in the field of science, where uncertainty and volatility is inherent may, prompt journalists to present the negative consequences of an emerging technology and hide the benefits. The impact of the way the media transcribes its articles affects society’s way of thinking and its way of running. For example, costly distorted information can affect “political actions,” and “individual decisions” (Retzbach and Maier

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