Sexuality In Lysistrata

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The most important difference between the Maestà and Lysistrata involves how sexuality is viewed by society. In the Greek religion of Lysistrata sexuality is always welcomed, even to the point of it being part of their rituals. Whereas the Roman Catholic Christian religion of the Maestà is not very open about sex, they valued purity. This is the most important difference because it shows how each culture valued sexuality of their people. The Greek religion incorporated sexuality into their everyday lives without question. Sexuality was expressed through their Gods and even used in their plays, showing their comfortability with sexuality. Yet, Roman Catholic Christians worshipped the center icon of the Maestà, Mary, for her chastity, her lack of sin of sex. In the …show more content…
The key to Athenian comedy was the giant strap on male members, due to this being a worship to the male god of fertility, Zeus. The strap on genitals were meant to bring a laugh, but it was also a symbolic and religious ritual worshipping the Gods to show loyalty and honor. Creating these rituals for the Gods was very important because when you honored the Gods, you honored your city. Sophocles ended Lysistrata with a sincere thank you to all the Gods in order to properly worship him after his symbols of worship through the strap on genitals and the sexuality events portrayed in the play. Religion was a very public matter due to the shared strong patriotic and religious views of the Athenians. Sexuality came along with the religion due to its common use and link to the Gods, making it a very comfortable and even spiritual topic among the people. The importance of sexuality regarding Lysistrata is seen through their strong religious views and means to do anything for the Gods, especially worshipping them through their set

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