Difference Between Client Centred Therapy And Psychodynamic Approach

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Psychotherapy is equipped with a wide variety of therapies, techniques, and orientations based on different models and theories of personality and psychopathology. Client Centered orientation, was developed by Carl Rogers, with a main focus revolving around the clients. Roger believed it is the clients who knew the best way of dealing with their own problems, and by listening to the words of the clients during a session, reflecting on their words and being empathetic, the therapist can help in the most effective way. Roger believed it to be important that the therapist try to understand the client in the best way, and constantly check whether their understanding and interpretation of the clients’ words are accurate. The client centered approach …show more content…
Psychopathology develops when personality has been discouraged from attaining superiority. In highlighting the differences in orientations between Psychodynamic approach and CBT, Psychodynamic focus on the clients’ past childhood experiences in order to raise the clients consciousness to their inferiority complex. CBT, however, takes a here and now perspective. From a Psychodynamic approach, individuals are seen to be driven by unconscious desires, whereas CBT state that beliefs are learned, not innate, and can be revised. Psychodynamic theory focuses on ego development and an interpersonal focus, while CBT focuses on dysfunctional and maladaptive cognitions. Looking at the differences in the therapeutic interventions between Psychodynamic Approach and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy the key therapeutic intervention used in the Psychodynamic Approach is free association. In CBT, the techniques used could be Socratic questioning, behavioral experiments, cognitive continuum, intellectual-emotional role plays and identifying, evaluating, and modifying of automatic thoughts. In Psychodynamic Therapy, there is a likelihood that the client could become dependent on their therapist whereas in CBT the client is educated to be self-directed. CBT sees the process of change as a relatively short-term process. Psychodynamic theory on the other hand, is a long term process of change. While both aim to reduce symptoms and distress, perhaps the most central difference between CBT and psychodynamic therapy is that psychodynamic therapy tries to get at why you feel or behave the way you do by uncovering deeper and often unconscious motivations for feelings and behavior. CBT educates clients to identify dysfunctional thought patterns, perceptions, and behavior and replace them with more realistic ones in order to alter behavior and emotions. Despite the

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