Comparing Hinduism And Buddhism

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From the content of the course, we can know that both of Hinduism and Buddhism are originated in the ancient India. However, the central concept of these two religions are totally different, or even is a dichotomy.
Hindus believe that “atman”, the inner-self or soul of every individual living being, is the microcosm of the ultimate reality in universe, “Brahman”. Each inner-self not only comes from Brahman, but also the manifestation of Brahman. “Atman is Brahman”, refers to that there is no distinction between our self and the primal reality. What’s more, our Atman will keep cycling in “Samsara”, the reincarnation, before we achieve Moksha, a state of emancipation, liberation from Samsara and the final goal of Hindu religious. In order to achieve Moksha, we can only go through
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To accomplish the superior state, we need to realize that our inner self is identical with “Brahman”. In the opposite, Buddhism declares that there is no ultimate reality behind the physical world, barely the emptiness. To get rid of the suffering, we should just pay attention to the mentality and behavior of ourselves, but not the upper-class reality. This is the advance variance after Atman and An-atman. From my point of view, “Brahman” just like a paramount authority which can awake individual’s respect and worship. In the contrast, the indication of emptiness like a caveat which is noticing human to concentrate on their private mind and performance. Besides, “Atman is Brahman” also indicates that all of us have the innately and compact connection with the universal consciousness. Nevertheless, the idea of combination (no independently existing "self") implies that all the living being is equal and separation. There is only “void”, no deity / lord / god / ultimately reality. In short words, Hinduism focuses on the cultivation of authority while Buddhism works on individual’s

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