Difference Between Aristotle And Democracy

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Register to read the introduction… While democrats believe that all freeborn people are equal, oligarchs believe that inequality in wealth implies inequality as a whole. Thus, the well off and the poor engage in factional conflict (1301a:30-40). Revolutions can occur in two ways. Sometimes factional conflict is with a view to the regime in the sense that it will transform from one to the other, such as democracy to oligarchy and oligarchy to democracy. There also may be factional conflict concerning more or less, such as more or less oligarchic run or less or more or less democratic run. There also may be factional conflict with a view to changing a part of the regime, such as abolishing a certain office …show more content…
First, is a state of mind that leads someone to form a faction. Second, is what can be gained or lost in forming a faction. Third, are the causes of political disputes leading to factions (1302a:20). In democracies, factional conflict only arise between the poor majority and the few rich. In oligarchies, two sorts of factional conflicts arise, on against each other and the other against the people. In addition, there are eleven potential causes of constitutional change which can lead to a revolution. They include profit, honor, arrogance, fear, preeminence, contempt, disproportion of growth, electioneering, underestimation, neglect of small things, and dissimilarity …show more content…
He recommends that the ruling part always be on guard against the beginning point of destruction, never try to deceive the masses, treat everyone well and fairly, with great respect to those outside the constitution, develop a state of emergency so that people will not attempt to revolt, prevent in-fighting between notables, ensure that the property assessment for office remains proportionate to the wealth of the city, be cautious not to award great promotions or significant withdrawals of honor too suddenly, be guarded of a class on this rise and give power to either the opposing or middle class, prevent public office from becoming a source of profit, and offer special consideration to the rich in a democracy and the poor in an oligarchy (1308a:5-40;1308b:5-40;1309a:5-30). Those who are going to rule in authoritative offices ought to have three things. First, affection for the regime. Second, a great capacity for the work involved in ruling. Third, they should have virtue and justice (1309a:35). In addition, is it crucial that a majority in the city be in favor of the constitution and that the constitution refrain from being too extreme, yet strive to be more of the middling element. Most important of all is the education relative to the regimes in the spirit of the constitution as being bound to a constitution can be liberating rather than enslaving

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