Didi And Hooche Analysis

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Didi and Gogo express a kind of egalitarianism whereas the Lucky-Pozzo couple is a study in the master-slave relation. But in a different way, the love-hate relation is operative in both. Didi and Gogo cannot help encountering each other in what looks like a scarcely populated earth. They want to drift apart but a strange love and care bind them. On the other hand, Pozzo is mortified by Lucky 's passivity sometimes. There is a dependency at work here too. When Lucky speaks his thought aloud, his master just cannot take it. Didi-Gogo act out a certain kind of stasis in the play in relation to which, the other couple undergoes radical changes in the second act. Lucky 's dumbness and Pozzo 's blindness in the second act is a pointer of change that takes place almost imperceptibly. As Pozzo despairingly says, he just went blind one day and Lucky dumb on another. The Didi-Gogo pair waits, while Pozzo 's famous …show more content…
So their Godot is Lucky’s Pozzo. The idea here is that they might recognize that waiting for salvation from Godot is to wait for nothing or to wait for an …show more content…
Hegel’s metaphor of Master-slave describes history and individual development as a struggle for freedom during which one usually gains superiority over another. Hegel’s metaphor supposed that true freedom would exist beyond this Master-slave, or Subject-object, framework. Pozzo dominates Lucky, but Vladimir and Estragon’s interaction is not so clear cut and this represents an attempt to describe of two individuals seeing each other as subjects (not objects). Their existence appears meaningless but they are actually doing what they can to avoid dominating or objectifying each other and subsequently, they avoid being dominated by Godot. Ironically, they long for a master but avoid one by

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