Summary: The Rise Of Feminism

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Feminism is described as “the belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities and organized activity in support of women 's rights and interests” ( Merriam-Webster). This term was created in 1872 by a male French philosopher who encouraged a Utopian world. The end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, Caucasian men fully held the 5. Feminism is what demanded change and gave women the right to run for political positions, changed views on parenting, and overall helped women advance in society (Malik, "4 Reason Feminism is a Threat to Black Consciousness" ). According to the Pan-African Alliance “The ‘First Wave’ of feminism began when white women banded together to demand a share of power, and the opportunity …show more content…
Organizations like the National American Woman Suffrage Association (comprised entirely of white women that denied membership to Black Women) drafted and pressured congress to pass the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1919, granting all women the right to vote,” (Malik, "4 Reason Feminism is a Threat to Black …show more content…
Many black women have become Black Feminists while many black males have become “anti-sex” or “sex-negative” feminists. Various African-American men believe that black feminists act as dictators instead of discussing the issues. They believe that black feminists command what is acceptable and what behaviors are not tolerated, while their opinions are ignored even if they are correct. (Malik, "4 Reason Feminism is a Threat to Black Consciousness"). Asad Malik, a writer for the Pan-African Alliance believes that “The Black community needs more dialogue, not small groups attempting to dictate to other groups how things are going to be. If unity is what we truly seek, men must learn to compromise with women and vice-verse,” (Malik, "4 Reason Feminism is a Threat to Black

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