Preventing Diabetes Prevention

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Diabetes Prevention Prevention is the key that locks the door of disease. There are many ways to prevent disease and likewise many ways not to prevent disease. Diabetes is one disease that is becoming more and more evident in todays society. The number of people being diagnosed with diabetes fast growing exponentially, but the good news is that it can be prevented before it becomes a problem. People can prevent the onset of diabetes by taking care of his or his body by exercising and eating healthy, decreasing risks for comorbidities, and annually visiting a physician. Some people that are eventually diagnosed with diabetes have worked hard to prevent the onset but his or her body did not adjust to the changes that were made before the …show more content…
Organs in the human body will be able to digest and metabolize foods so that excess sugar not being used properly, will not stored in the body. Most people realize that exercising and eating healthy is the standard and basic way to stay healthy. The general popular may also agree that acting on this understanding can be easier said than done. Exercise and eating healthy have been proven to cause an individual to maintain a balance of sugar in the body that can be controlled. R. Laliberte (2014): Losing just 7% of body weight (that’s 10.5 pounds for a 150-pound person) by eating a healthier diet helped people reduce diabetes risk by 58% in the landmark Diabetes Prevention Program. More exercise or at least walk around every 20 minutes. This can keep blood sugar from spiking after meals—plus, active muscles use insulin more efficiently. The goal to aim for: 150 minutes of cardio and weight training a week. (p. 079). Engaging in healthier eating habits and establishing an exercising routine is one of the cheapest and modifiable ways to prevent diabetes.
Comorbid risks that aid in the development of diabetes can be a long list. By decreasing these risk factors, the chances of diabetes progressing will lower. Health problems such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and obesity are major indicators that a person has a high probability of developing diabetes. These are all considered comorbid diagnoses that relate to

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