Rhetorical Analysis Of 'Then And Now: Black Power'

Good Essays
Several police shootings across the nation have sparked a debate over police officers’ integrity and commitment to defend all lives. According to a report published by The Guardian, African Americans are more likely to die at the hands of law enforcement than any other race (citation). Dezmon Bradley, an author of The Celebritea Entertainment News, a young and edgy pop culture blog, examines and critiques the success and failures of famous celebrities each week. He concludes whether their career lives up to the powerful platforms the public gives them. His current article, "Then and Now: Black Power," is motivated by recent police brutality and how past and present celebrities address unequal treatment of African Americans. In his article, …show more content…
Before beginning the article, Bradley establishes pathos through a photo of African Americans from earlier and present times raising a clenched fist. In the 1960s, the black power movement used the clenched fist as a statement of defiance against racial oppression. This photo invokes from the audience a sense of black pride and a realization of continual social injustice. Moving into his article, Bradley uses phrases such as “my melanin brothers and sisters," "how many of us they gun down," and "successes of our brothers and sisters." The phrase “my melanin brothers and sister” establishes Bradley 's target audience, the African American community. He chose this audience because they already relate to and understand the implications of his argument. The first person use of “us” and “our” makes the audience feel that Bradley is standing with them in the fight for social justice. These phrases are biased because they solely appeal to an African American audience. He writes, “the acknowledgment that our struggle is not unheard or ignored.” This quote is a use of kairos due to the recent rise of racial injustice faced by the African American community. This quote is also a use of pathos due to the emotional frustration over police …show more content…
He begins with Rosa Parks, the mother of the civil rights movement. In 1955, she refused to be continually treated as a second class citizen and remained seated in the white passenger-only section. Nelson Mandela, South African anti-apartheid activist, was arrested and sentenced to life in prison, in 1962, for igniting a revolt against a racist political system. Beyonce, the international singer, addressed police brutality through her hit song “Formation,” performance clothing, and dance moves at the 2016 super bowl performance. To emphasize these celebrities successes he employs several photos of their substantial contributions to social injustice. Bradley chose stars whose actions and statuses are recognized around the world. Picking celebrities from different eras and social backgrounds allows his message to be interpreted and understood by a wide age range of African Americans with various social interests. Through this section, he also employs the use of logos. In the first paragraph, he states that “to identify the birthday of Racism, one must have patience, understanding, and time!” He creates this understanding of racism for the reader in a chronological timeline of celebrities fighting and addressing different social injustices. The audience can identify from the timeline that as each era passes there is continual social injustice through generations of African Americans.

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Malcolm X Essay

    • 1204 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The movement frequently protests, police killings of black people, raising the concerns of racial profiling, fighting against police brutality, and racial inequality in the United States. Malcolm X triggered the start of the Black Lives Matter movement fifty years later because he advocated for black pride and empowerment. Dr. King was an integrationist preaching for blacks and whites to work together in civilization. The BLM movement has emphasized sit-ins in the spirit of MLK due to the racism and issues in the United States. The Black Lives Matter movement protested on violence and racism, but people refer to the fact that All Lives should matter.…

    • 1204 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    For this reason, the BLM movement is one where being aware of the inexcusable acts that are inflicted on the African American community, knowing what BLM stands for, and how to get more people involved, might be able to change the course of our future for people of all different races. This movement strikes a core in the black community because of the history that they have with the United States. Furthermore, BLM will only continue to grow; and in this country, where hate towards others seems to be a popular trend, the message that BLM is trying to send out is quite the opposite; we need more love towards…

    • 717 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    As years have passed the movement “Black Lives Matter has become a transformative outlet for all black people from different historical, cultural, socioeconomic and political identities. It is a source of solidarity for the survivors of colonization, exploitation, capitalism and police brutality.”( Miah, Malik.) African Americans have used this movement to bring each other together and fight for what is still persistent, which is racism. There has been controversy about “BLM” which stretched the opinion that the movement was very racist. Arguments have come about that there is no way the advancement of another race can happen if the movement is saying the other races do not matter.…

    • 1248 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Each African American understands the hardships behind being a black male or female in the United States. Chris Dixon is seen favoring his own race during the decision on who to punish for fighting. As an African American, he understood what is was like to grow up as an underprivileged member in society. Chris decided to take racism into effect when his decision needed to be made on who to punish. In Jesse Byrnes’ article White Americans Don’t Understand Being Black in America, Former Speaker Newt Gingrich expresses his feelings towards today’s racism after recent police brutality on African Americans.…

    • 2024 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Throughout history blacks have faced hardships that have defined their characters and drove them to stand up in the face of inequality. In the book Why We Cannot Wait, by Martin Luther King Jr. voices the events of tragedy, segregation and oppression the blacks of Birmingham faced, and how their political leaders were dead set on keeping the Jim Crow lifestyle in their town and segregation in their schools. Dr. Martin Luther king Jr along with members of the N.A.A.C.P and other pro black right activist groups made it their duty to help the black civilians of Birmingham by non violent protest, which opened the eyes of the American people by witnessing the horrible consequences the activist faced when standing up for their right to be treated…

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    All Lives Matter is the key solution to resolving the segregation of race. With Black Lives Matter becoming a major issue, capturing the attention of many, it has become apparent that people have taken advantage of the spotlight. Yes, Black lives do matter, but so do White lives, Hispanic lives, Muslim lives, and every other race present in our country matters just the same. So why do African Americans get all the spotlight? By proposing that All Lives Matter instead of Black Lives Matter, it will most definitely gain support from a handful of people, and once the African American race realizes that there is a much bigger issue at hand, they too will support All Lives Matter.…

    • 1794 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    While Staples grew up in Chester, Pennsylvania, surrounded by criminal activity that made individuals of his race look fearful. Other than the difference in location, both Hurston and Staples share similar and contrasting views about the effect the color of their skin, disparate ways of coping with the discrimination they face, to empower themselves as African Americans. They embody their race to showcase them stronger individuals, and to show white societies that not all African Americans are the same. To begin, Hurston and Staples face discrimination through simple actions they portray throughout a normal day. For instance, Hurston’s experience being raised in a predominately African neighborhood deviated her socialization with white Americans.…

    • 1384 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In the 21st century, during a time of racial tension in America, Ta-Nehisi, African American author and father, wrote “ Letter to Son,” a story about the racial injustices and corrupt government system built to tyrannize and destroy the black community. Coates claims that the oppression against African Americans continues to happen in today’s society because of the principles of slavery that the United States of America was built on. He supports his claim by helping the reader to draw the connection between the abuse of the black body and current issues in today’s society like police brutality, white superiority , and the unfair treatment of the black minority. He goes on to describe how white america has made it its job to keep all people especially african americans believing they are inferior to and less than the white man whether that being through the breaking down the black man subconsciously or physically. In the text, Ta- Nehisi goal was to explain to his son and other people of african descent that the it was America’s racist history that created a system that oppresses and dismantles the black community.Coates transitions between a frank and sympathetic tone to allow the reader to understand racism’s role in America.…

    • 1010 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Racial Profiling Essay

    • 1451 Words
    • 6 Pages

    According to Brent Staples, an African American author of the narrative “Black men and Public Spaces: Just Walk By,” understands what it means to be erroneously profiled when he describes his experience, “women are particularly vulnerable to street violence, and young black males are drastically overrepresented among the perpetrators of that violence. Yet these truths are no solace against the kind of alienation that comes of being ever the suspect, against being set apart, a fearsome entity with whom pedestrians avoid making eye contact” (¶ 6). It saddens me to know that people such as Staples must cope with discrimination and be victims of racial profiling when they have not carried out any nefarious act. Racial profiling overtly defies the frequently used phrase “Don’t judge a book by its…

    • 1451 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    “We used to lament this as the falling off of our friends; now the Negro must rejoice and pray to be delivered both from self-pity and condescension” (Locke 977). Locke is saying that for the Negro he must know himself and be known for who he is. “Subtly the conditions that are molding a New Negro are molding a new America” (Locke 978). This was an important time in the black community, which called for more understanding and justice gain. In this time the Renaissance had caused a postive shift in the black community.…

    • 995 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays