Rhetorical Analysis Of 'Then And Now: Black Power'

878 Words 4 Pages
Several police shootings across the nation have sparked a debate over police officers’ integrity and commitment to defend all lives. According to a report published by The Guardian, African Americans are more likely to die at the hands of law enforcement than any other race (citation). Dezmon Bradley, an author of The Celebritea Entertainment News, a young and edgy pop culture blog, examines and critiques the success and failures of famous celebrities each week. He concludes whether their career lives up to the powerful platforms the public gives them. His current article, "Then and Now: Black Power," is motivated by recent police brutality and how past and present celebrities address unequal treatment of African Americans. In his article, …show more content…
Before beginning the article, Bradley establishes pathos through a photo of African Americans from earlier and present times raising a clenched fist. In the 1960s, the black power movement used the clenched fist as a statement of defiance against racial oppression. This photo invokes from the audience a sense of black pride and a realization of continual social injustice. Moving into his article, Bradley uses phrases such as “my melanin brothers and sisters," "how many of us they gun down," and "successes of our brothers and sisters." The phrase “my melanin brothers and sister” establishes Bradley 's target audience, the African American community. He chose this audience because they already relate to and understand the implications of his argument. The first person use of “us” and “our” makes the audience feel that Bradley is standing with them in the fight for social justice. These phrases are biased because they solely appeal to an African American audience. He writes, “the acknowledgment that our struggle is not unheard or ignored.” This quote is a use of kairos due to the recent rise of racial injustice faced by the African American community. This quote is also a use of pathos due to the emotional frustration over police …show more content…
He begins with Rosa Parks, the mother of the civil rights movement. In 1955, she refused to be continually treated as a second class citizen and remained seated in the white passenger-only section. Nelson Mandela, South African anti-apartheid activist, was arrested and sentenced to life in prison, in 1962, for igniting a revolt against a racist political system. Beyonce, the international singer, addressed police brutality through her hit song “Formation,” performance clothing, and dance moves at the 2016 super bowl performance. To emphasize these celebrities successes he employs several photos of their substantial contributions to social injustice. Bradley chose stars whose actions and statuses are recognized around the world. Picking celebrities from different eras and social backgrounds allows his message to be interpreted and understood by a wide age range of African Americans with various social interests. Through this section, he also employs the use of logos. In the first paragraph, he states that “to identify the birthday of Racism, one must have patience, understanding, and time!” He creates this understanding of racism for the reader in a chronological timeline of celebrities fighting and addressing different social injustices. The audience can identify from the timeline that as each era passes there is continual social injustice through generations of African Americans.

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