Deviance In Hip Hop Culture

714 Words 3 Pages
The new generation of Hip-Hop set an example for the rest of America to show how another man “struggle” is another man “gain.” Through out history, they have been a number of cultural expectations that evoke the merging of youth cultures of organizational conformity and deviance. African Americans are the jewels of the nation. They have been the chosen ones to show their pain, power and strength through music, culture and politics. According to Bakari Kitwana, African American’s were the “first generation “for whom the civil rights movement, its ideology and its heroes, loom large over our definition of ourselves and our fellow Americans” (Kitwana 2004, 115). As this paper puts it, certain expectations were not met for African Americans because …show more content…
The Hip-Hop generation is glorifying drugs, violence, money and sex appeal. So the African American youth are still at risk and living through a crisis. Hip-Hop is multi-formed because of “hip-hop unique moment in history where our generation’s cultural movement is preceding its political one” (Kitwana 2004, 117). The construction of Hip-Hop itself unfolds through a device known as a crisis structure. How do I know this? The subculture promotes violence, which tries to put in a sense that killing and going to jail is okay. The youth culture 's norms, values and beliefs are at risk due to the music videos, song lyric and movies. The Hip-Hop culture does not “harbor traditional Black cultural concerns” but reconstructed their own social norms to follow (Kitwana 2004, 117). Conley states, “local traditions conflict with universally recognized human rights” because a subculture can create their own rules and regulations (85). Meaning young blacks are at risk because of the gap between cultural movement and the political …show more content…
The youth need to be motivated by education, valuable spoken word and opportunities not money, cars, clothes and ho’s. Kitwana explains how, “Hip-Hop generationers are attempting to seriously engage in the mainstream political process” (Kitwana 2004, 118). The crisis the young blacks are facing has to come to an end. Hip-Hop should be used a social justice tool to promote social change. Hip-Hop should be seen as being the voice of the world and not the cause of the crisis. Hip-Hop should address issues, such as, education, discrimination, police brutality, and unemployment. There is a time where looking beyond the tradition of Hip-Hop is needed. Therefore “synthesizing the various ideologies of yesterday and today into concrete unforeseen political perspectives that can and will bring about radical change for our time” (Kitwana 2004,

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