Hip-Hop And Youth Culture

Improved Essays
The new generation of Hip-Hop set an example for the rest of America to show how another man “struggle” is another man “gain.” Through out history, they have been a number of cultural expectations that evoke the merging of youth cultures of organizational conformity and deviance. African Americans are the jewels of the nation. They have been the chosen ones to show their pain, power and strength through music, culture and politics. According to Bakari Kitwana, African American’s were the “first generation “for whom the civil rights movement, its ideology and its heroes, loom large over our definition of ourselves and our fellow Americans” (Kitwana 2004, 115). As this paper puts it, certain expectations were not met for African Americans because …show more content…
The Hip-Hop generation is glorifying drugs, violence, money and sex appeal. So the African American youth are still at risk and living through a crisis. Hip-Hop is multi-formed because of “hip-hop unique moment in history where our generation’s cultural movement is preceding its political one” (Kitwana 2004, 117). The construction of Hip-Hop itself unfolds through a device known as a crisis structure. How do I know this? The subculture promotes violence, which tries to put in a sense that killing and going to jail is okay. The youth culture 's norms, values and beliefs are at risk due to the music videos, song lyric and movies. The Hip-Hop culture does not “harbor traditional Black cultural concerns” but reconstructed their own social norms to follow (Kitwana 2004, 117). Conley states, “local traditions conflict with universally recognized human rights” because a subculture can create their own rules and regulations (85). Meaning young blacks are at risk because of the gap between cultural movement and the political …show more content…
The youth need to be motivated by education, valuable spoken word and opportunities not money, cars, clothes and ho’s. Kitwana explains how, “Hip-Hop generationers are attempting to seriously engage in the mainstream political process” (Kitwana 2004, 118). The crisis the young blacks are facing has to come to an end. Hip-Hop should be used a social justice tool to promote social change. Hip-Hop should be seen as being the voice of the world and not the cause of the crisis. Hip-Hop should address issues, such as, education, discrimination, police brutality, and unemployment. There is a time where looking beyond the tradition of Hip-Hop is needed. Therefore “synthesizing the various ideologies of yesterday and today into concrete unforeseen political perspectives that can and will bring about radical change for our time” (Kitwana 2004, 119). The young generation has been influenced by the Hip-Hop culture in many ways. The word “Ni88a” has been transformed and recognize as being a common word for the African American community. But in reality “Ni88a” is a word that started the idea of “post-segregation” before it was legalized. American is built on a lot of faults that lead to the construct of the Hip-Hop subculture. If blacks were treated like everyone else in society, Hip-Hop will not exist. Hip-Hop is the African American community scapegoat and the youth easiest ways to fail. Hip-Hop can be seen as a weapon

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Macklemore empowers African Americans through his lyrics in ‘White Privilege II’ Gray says we can see how lyrics today can voice, African Americans issues they face in their daily lives. An article, written by Jacquelyn Gray, analyzes Macklemore’s lyrics in ‘White Privilege II’. Macklemore’s lyrics are providing his place in the situation the black community are facing, from innocent deaths, or discrimination against their race. Macklemore is showing that his empowerment through his words to African Americans, he knows the fact that society is listening to Hip Hop, trying to be apart of this community, but aren’t seeing the true meaning of the lyrics in the songs. This mean that every race besides African Americans that are consumers of Hip Hop music are not seeing the real issue, but pushing them aside and not standing with this very strong community.This leads to no one standing besides African Americans and not making the issue better but leading it to grow.…

    • 2480 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This is only focusing on sociohistorical circumstances. Only focusing on the history results to a misunderstanding of the background of hip hop and its development over time. With the history tied into hip hop Kelly states, "The criminal-justice system changed just when hip hop was born. Economic reconstructing resulting in massive unemployment has created criminals out of black youth" (Kelly, 118). This goes to show that the history of hip hop has had a made a full effect on the African American…

    • 509 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The major idea or perspective that American hip-hop and rap is trying to expose, is the oppression African Americans and other minorities face on a day to day basis. Hip-hop’s growth caused the idea of fighting back against the oppressor a reality. Rappers in the 90s took the ideas and were inspired by the original rappers in the 70s and used it to fight against their common oppressor, their society. For example, when N.W.A. said “F*ck the police” , the decision of making and performing a song about racial based police was a huge controversial event.…

    • 1053 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    It is a multi-faceted form of expression used by artists to create change, and it has many resources in order to do so. Hip-Hop is an intangible force that is so strong it changed the future course of African-American youth, and the outlook on their lives. It can be said that if the American dream is still alive, it lives in the pens, mics, turntables, Puma’s, and spray paint cans of…

    • 769 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Flyboy 2 Themes

    • 1531 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Tate also discusses the injustices that the hip hop industry had to face in relation to whites attempting to profit off of an institution that was intended to assist in black freedom. The Black Power and Civil Rights Movements often displayed the harsh realties within the African American society that many didn’t want to accept as real and factual. They also empowered the approaches that blacks had to take to earn racial equality. The writings of musical geniuses Michael Jackson, Ice Cube and Sade, along with white supremacy in the hip hop industry, exemplify the cruel and unforgiving past that still haunts African Americans today. Art is a form of expression that many…

    • 1531 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Hip Hop began as an escape for the poor and troubled youth in inner cities to have somewhere free and safe from the tough world that they were brought into. Many argue that in modern America, Hip Hop has not fully kept with its roots of being a safe haven for African-Americans and Latinos in the projects. Many believe that the core beliefs and culture of Hip Hop has has been taken away from the African American community by “corporate” America and that the culture needs to stay in the black community. This is a widespread debate among the African American community and in some ways, I believe they are right. Although, I also believe that to understand the true meaning of Hip Hop culture would be to not limit the culture to only one race.…

    • 722 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    More and more rappers are being accepted into the culture based on the skill rather than race. I’ve always believed that music is colorblind. The evolution of rap music is a perfect example of how music accepts based on ability rather than background. In its young stages, the majority of artists were African American. Now they still hold the majority, but are embracing others into the culture.…

    • 1539 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Within that first chapter of “Understanding Black American Aspects In Hip Hip Cinema”, it focused on the aspect of importance of hip hop music, where it developed, and who it affected while also touching on politics instead of focusing on the negative. Hip Hop music is able to impact lives through movies, music, live performances, or even just reading the lyrics. The first chapter which is called “Historical and Musical Background” explains how hip-hop music started. It talks about key concepts that involve different purposes and the Black musical heritage in American cinema. “Hip hop recording and live Rap performances gave visibility to millions of urban youths whose dreams, frustrations and aspirations were hidden as the system discounted them” (Understand Black American…page…

    • 770 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “Hip-hop is an environment created to protect the masses from obscene impositions of cultural dominance” while Black Lives Matter is a movement created to fight against these “obscene impositions” and the injustices, violence, and oppressions they cause. Black Lives Matter as a vocalized or hashtagged expression is not as taboo nor controversial as it once was before hip hop culture and its beloved artists combined this related movement into the larger movement of hip hop culture. It is the years of efforts by hip hop culture that has broadened Black Lives Matter within other communities, such as when NFL player Colin Kaepernick of the San Francisco 49ers sat during the national anthem to protest police brutality, or when actor Jesse Williams spoke against this same violence during the 2016 BET Awards. With the collaboration and alliance of Black Lives Matter and hip hop culture as a “developing sociopolitical consciousness to…. bring down the walls of an ongoing American hypocrisy,” it is argued their combined influence will be “as powerful as the civil rights movement,” and thus, ensure that black lives, as argued for decades by hip hop culture, do in fact matter (The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education,…

    • 1484 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    When people were ask to define rap music? The seem to say its a style of popular music. Rap is a form of rhyming with sound expressing ones anger or thoughts in music form. Rap music have been in the America society seen the 70s. Rap music was popular among African- American people, it’s been a type of news to inform the population of how black were been treated.…

    • 1266 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays