Rise Of Christianity Research Paper

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Christianity, a religion known the world over however, It did not start this way and its rise to preeminence was fraught with alienation, destitution and persecution. Christianity follows the belief that a man named Jesus who was a great teacher of his time and regarded by his followers to not only be a prophet but in fact the flesh and blood incarnation of God. Came to this world in order to redeem mankind whom in the eyes of God had been willingly lead down the path of sin, though their trespasses had apparently not warranted an extinction level event such as found in the story of Noah and the flood. Instead he chose a different route and gave to mankind a message of love and toleration for one another. The Jewish leaders and Roman officials …show more content…
Even within itself the Christian church was experiencing a plethora of schism’s it was during the First Council of Nicaea that Nicene Christianity was developed by the bishops at the time, this was an effort to unify Christians and in many ways it worked solidifying the doctrine of Christianity that the clergy could get behind and a message they believed their messiah had intended. However, in Rome, Christianity was a state religion and still fell to the authority of the emperor, there were a few minor conflicts between clergy and state officials on matters of authority though nothing extreme, that is until the Massacre at Thessalonica. The Massacre at Thessalonica is seen by many in the clergy at the time as the flash point between these sentiments of control over their church the event started with the stoning of state officials for the imprisonment of a charioteer who was very popular in Thessalonica by the populace. When word of the incident reached the emperor, Theodosius I, he was furious and sent his soldiers to the city with orders to treat it as a hostile city to be captured. As a result, the soldiers slaughtered seven thousand people, although Theodosius had quickly changed his mind on the matter his new order to stand down and return home would …show more content…
To the days of toleration for their religion within the Roman Empire and its cementation as the official religion of that empire. Then finally to its ability to survive and thrive after the fall of the Roman Empire it is that Christianity, relatively speaking, swiftly achieved what hundreds of other religions had tried for centuries and millenniums to do, which was to spread onto the tongues of peoples, throughout all nations and creeds, so to ferment in their minds and root within their

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