Descriptive Techniques In Parkinson's Alley

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The descriptive style of writing used in Joy Horowitz’s Parkinson’s Alley helps connect the reader to the individuals, their struggles and the problem that is threatening livelihoods in Visalia, California. Without the description embedded in this article, it could be very easy for the readers to get lost or lose interest. A tie is created after you learn a thing or two about “A big, friendly bear of a man” (Horowitz) who has been ultimately screwed over by his government when they decide to do nothing about the issue at hand. When you think about a stereotypical research article, especially one about pesticides, you imagine a bland, sophisticated and lengthy article to be placed in front of you. Instead, with Horowitz’s piece, you are met …show more content…
Horowitz introduction is written as follows; “McDermott tosses me the keys to his pickup, and I hoist his chrome walker into the truck's bed.” (Horwitz) The way she chose to start out the article grabs you and pulls you along for the story. She uses vague and modest words to describe the brief but informative event that just took place; Bruce gets into the car. This scene is illustrated with important word choice. The word ‘chrome’ automatically pulls the reader to that part of the sentence, drawing attention to the fact that Bruce has a walker. Instead of just saying she hoisted his walker into the truck she writes” I hoist his chrome walker into the truck’s bed.” (Horowitz) This simple addition of the word chrome draws notice to the fact that he has a disability, which we ultimately learn is from the use of the pesticides. Since this is just the beginning of the article we do not know this yet so we are left wondering why he has this chrome walker. Intriguing word choice like this appeals to the reader and helps create a solid first …show more content…
Horowitz’s mentions how Langston, a scientific director at Parkinson’s Institute “had been asked to examine a cluster of young patients who looked like living statues…” (Horowitz) Studies found that the patients had used a new form of synthetic heroin, which contains the compound MPTP. This compound is very similar to the chemical they use in popular herbicides. Horowitz describes the extreme cases as looking like “living statues” (Horowitz.) This illustrates the severity of the case and is also a more reader-friendly descriptive. Almost everyone has seen a statue before so, picturing someone being as still as one after hard drug use is a scary image. Once again, the authors descriptive writing style annunciates on the issues present in the 60-year-old gold rush

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