Vincent Van Gogh Art Style

Decent Essays
David May
Kucharski
Drawing I
Due: December 5th

Vincent Van Gogh

Vincent Van Gogh is most commonly known for his style of “impasto” which is a technique where paint, usually oil paint is laid on thickly and sometimes in layers so that the paint strokes are visible to the viewer. However, throughout his lifetime, Van Gogh experimented with many different styles and techniques. Some of those being oil paintings, watercolors, drawings, and sketches. But even within these different styles, one could look at them and immediately tell they were produced by Van Gogh because his style is so unique, his use of vibrant colors and seemingly blurred lines were a part of his trademark.
Vincent van Gogh was an artist that was rather unique, he seemingly always worked with a great sense of urgency which also stressed him out. But his bold, dramatic brush strokes is what he is more than well known for. This method allowed him a creative outlet to express his emotions and add them and movement to his works. Vincent van Gogh began his career as an artist by copying different prints and reading manuals and books to teach himself. His thoughts were that you should know how to draw before you could become a great
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However, after he moved to Paris, his paintings changed dramatically due to the fact that he bacame greatly influenced by Impressionists and Neo-Impressionists of that time. His palette began to take on lighter more natural colors such as reds, yellows, blues, greens and oranges. This is also a time when he experimented with the broken brush strokes similar to those of Impressionists. He also attempted pointillist techniques of Neo-Impressionists by constrasting dots of pure color and mix them into the resulting color by the viewer. A great example of this technique is in “Self-Portrait with a Straw Hat” of

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