Descartes Perception Of Reality

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Reality is a complex thought exhibited within a singular dimension, the true world. Aldous Huxley once asserted, “there are things known and there are things unknown, and in between are the doors of perception. Perceptions are misconceptions, which elicit inaccurate understandings of the true world; thus they cannot be considered reality. While humans are capable of contemplating such misinterpretations, they must be false, as mankind itself is confined by a worldly boundary.
The idea of developing perceptions proves to only lead to untruthful projections of reality. The human ability to envisage such thoughts are the source behind this unreliability, since once stimuli is received humans begin to perceive. What is seen and heard may not always
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Descartes affirms sensory information does not convey accurate or truthful information. Furthermore, Descartes discusses the relation between the state of dreaming and reception of stimuli. Through this perspective it is explained how deceptive dreams can be since he expresses how the same sensations and stimuli can be experienced both while awake and during sleep. In fact, just as Neo thought Morhpeus’s ideas to be deceptive, Descartes shows how deceptions from a greater outside source, in the film’s case, the real world, are not influential since one’s recognition of being deceived is sufficient to realize one’s existence; “I think, therefore I am”(Meditations of First Philosophy). On this premise Descartes explains this to be the reason why it is so difficult to differentiate a dream from being awake. Furthermore, Descartes explains since the senses can be deceived the senses and assumptions made under the justification of the senses. Some may argue since two worlds exist, as in the Matrix, humans could not possibly differentiate the perceptions conceived in each respective world. Yet, this opposition only supports Descartes’s views since Descartes himself explains how the same relationship is shared between the perceptions drawn while sleeping and being …show more content…
Mankind comes to truly understand reality of the world through every level of comprehension, much like how Neo comes to comprehend if the new reality is a deception, after being aware of the matrix’s deception. In the same manner Plato interprets true reality as a product of forms, the representations of what think, see, and know. In other words, forms are the copies of perfect objects. In contrast, Descartes explains how true reality is only guaranteed by the individuals themselves, capable of producing thoughts, God and God’s creations. According to Descartes, the senses alone are not sufficient to determine reality, instead there is a necessity for thought and comprehension by the human mind to arrive at a

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