Deprivation In Early Childhood

1579 Words 7 Pages
Register to read the introduction… His 44 thieves study in 1944, involved looking at 88 children from a guidance clinic. Half of the children were there because they were emotionally maladjusted. The other half were thieves and did not feel guilt for the crimes they had committed. After researching the children's early lives, Bowlby found that 86% of the thieves had experienced long-term separation from their mothers compared to few of the other children. Bowlby therefore concluded that deprivation in early childhood does have negative consequences later in …show more content…
Therefore this seems to suggest that other factors were involved. Some children may be separated, but later in life depending on their treatment at home or at school may be able to proceed as any other child. Bowlby did not take into account the individual differences with every child. Another criticism is that we don't know how long the separations lasted for. If a child is separated from its mother for a few months in early infanthood this may have a detrimental effect on the child's development, however if the child and mother are separated for a couple of weeks and then proceed as normal, it would be unlikely to have any noticeable effects. Other problems that can be found in Bowlby's research are that he is basing his results on the study in his clinic. This is not representative of children of all cultures or even children in one country. The area that the clinic was in, makes a difference to the results. The clinic may be in a rundown area, therefore stealing may be a more common occurrence. This is a confounding variable which would affect Bowlby's results making them less valid. If we are to believe Bowlby, then a child who experiences deprivation in early infanthood, should have negative consequences later in …show more content…
When looking at the attachments within the family, the adopted children formed closer attachments than the other children, but this was concluded to be because these children were going to homes that really wanted children, whereas the other children were going to homes where there had been problems in the first place. From this study, we can see that the negative aspects of the children's early lives could be overcome by forming new attachments, but there were still noticeable effects when looking at how the children interacted with other people. This research therefore supports the claim that early infant attachments have consequences later in

Related Documents