Art Therapy In Treating Depression

1361 Words 6 Pages
Introduction Depression is a mental illness and mood disorder that negatively impacts the way in which an individual lives their life on a daily basis. Symptoms include fatigue, loss of appetite, disinterest in activities, persistent melancholiness, suicidal thoughts, and sometimes suicide (NIMH). Current statistics show that depression affects about 350 million people worldwide (WHO), illustrating that it is a very common mental issue that affects a multitude of different people. While depression can be found in many different age groups, it usually begins in adults. There is a wide variety of treatment options for depressed individuals, including medications, and therapeutic options such as psychotherapy, behavioral therapy, and interpersonal …show more content…
Many pieces of academic writing have covered art therapy and its effects on adults with depression, serving as a platform to evaluate whether or not art therapy is useful and helpful for depressed individuals. Each field in which the articles are written provides a unique perspective on the issue of depression and using art therapy as a way to treat it. This can be seen in the rhetorical choices of two articles: “On Considering the Role of Art Therapy in Treating Depression,” a social sciences article, and “Time for Me: The Arts as Therapy in Postnatal Depression,” a humanities and applied sciences article. While both of these articles show substantial differences connected to their different perspectives, methods, and purpose, they both value the extent to which art therapy positively impacts a depressed person’s life, a promising finding for potential interdisciplinary work on the …show more content…
Catherine Perry and her colleagues wrote “Time for Me” from an applied sciences and social sciences perspective, while utilizing an experimental method to understand how art therapy affects adult mothers with postnatal depression. Meanwhile, Stephanie Wise wrote her humanities article from using a case study to persuade the audience that art therapy is truly beneficial in treating depression in adults. Even though the articles have their own distinctive characteristics, a common thread is that depressed individuals can turn to art therapy as a way to treat their symptoms. This theme within both papers shows that there could possibly be some interdisciplinary work done between the two fields, or even between other fields that focus on this particular topic. Gathering multiple perspectives and ideas on art therapy in regards to treating depression can assist in creating a greater understanding of the issue, as well as illustrate that various individuals of a multitude of backgrounds and fields can come together to make change for the enhancement of

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