Peisistratus's Polis

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Archaic Greece was a period in time which innovation, development, and revolution changed the course of physical, geographical cities and political ideology. The “polis” or city state was a vital part to the development and change of politics and fundamental ideology . Each polis had different laws from Athens to Sparta and each Polis had different aspects that made them unique and distinguished them from each other. Sparta was a very exclusive and rigid polis with an emphasis on battle, blood, and courage whereas Athens’s concentration tuned towards communication, trade, and government. While Athens, is very well known for the birth of democracy it is important and necessary to see and acknowledge the development of Greece’s overall political …show more content…
Peisistratus used the dissension of his predecessor’s, Solon, reforms to obtain power and the favor of the masses . While Peisistratus was perceived as a trickster he used his former position as a general of the army as a part of his influence. He was seen by many as a strong pinnacle of strength . Peisistratus made many additions including buildings, fountains, temples, etc. . It can be argued however, that his greatest contribution to Athens’s polis was the introduction of loans and the encouragement of cash crops (e.g. olives) . While at first this contribution may seem small and insignificant, the production and growth of the cash crop olives would eventually set Athens up as a major exporting polis where their primary export and cash crop would be olives . This is a very important step especially for …show more content…
Peisistratus’s sons were not known for much except for their deaths. Hipparchus was assassinated which spiraled Hippias into a cruel and bitter rule until he was eventually overthrown by Sparta’s leader. This is commonly known as the end of The Age of Tyrants, however it was not the end of other tyrants’ rule . Throughout the years of being ruled under different tyrants under Solon’s constitution and the effects of Peisistratus’s rule left Athenians of all kinds with a strong sense of nationalism. This made it harder for the traditional aristocrats to return to an oligarchical

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