Dell Technologies Case Study

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Dell, now known as Dell Technologies is a global company that offers a vast array of IT products and services. They have hardware and software for enterprise, government, small business units, and the simple home computer segment. In September 2016, Dell acquired EMC, which enabled them to now offer large computer storage systems (Hardy, 2016). Based on information from their website, Dell Technologies offers a large product line. They offer laptops, desktops, tablets, gaming systems, workstations, thin clients, servers, storage devices, networking capabilities, monitors, printers, ink, software, electronics, and gateways. The OptiPlex is their business line that is geared toward the business oriented user and is usually the product that is …show more content…
The company is currently operating in 34 countries and three world regions (Strategies, n.d.). They employ a geographical divisional structure; dividing themselves by: The Americas (Canada, Brazil, Chile and the U.S.), Asia-Pacific (Australia, China, India, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, New Zealand, Taiwan, and South Korea), Japan, Europe/Middle East/Africa (EMEA) (Strategies, n.d.). As described by Parnell (2014), the company has activities and personnel grouped by specific geographic locations. Dell has vowed to invest 125 billion in China during the next five years; focusing on expanding their presence in the country, R & D activities and artificial intelligence (Dell to invest, 2015). The company believes that these emerging markets provide prime long-term growth potential. They are constantly looking to pursue the technologies to meet those market’s …show more content…
Other companies had managed to keep up by acquisitions, mergers and development of new products. Dell had remained stagnant in the PC world. Michael Dell decided it was time to step back in as CEO because the company was losing share in the Personal computer market and was under investigation for inconsistencies in its accounting practices under the leadership of the CEO that he had hand chosen to succeed him years earlier (Edwards, 2009). One of the first things that he did was begin the process of acquisitions and mergers. He also replaced a large majority of the people that reported directly to him. He filled those roles with people who could help sharpen the focus to that of the customer and could help him move the company beyond just production of the standard personal computer (Edwards, 2009). He soon began expanding the company’s offerings to services such as software and adding new hardware categories; including smartphones and tablet-like devices. In late 2007, Dell began selling computers at Wal-Mart; the first retail offering of its kind for the company (Edwards,

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