Dehumanizing Body Of Slaves In Jacob's Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass

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Through literary techniques, writers are able to generate stories that arise sympathy and increase understanding of their audience, providing them with the tools necessary to bring change within society. This is demonstrated in Jacob and Douglass’s works as they embody the human correlation in races through their description of the dehumanizing body of slavery. In his autobiography, “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglas”, set in the early to middle 1800s in the states of Maryland, New York, New Bedford and Baltimore, Frederick Douglas highlights the cruel aspects of slavery and his transition from a boy into a young man through his escape from slavery, serving as a source of inspiration for former slaves. Similarly in the slave narrative, …show more content…
Jacobs addresses her female audience very well by staying respectful even if the topic of slavery lights up a flame full of rage inside of her. She hopes that the reader never experiences the horrors that she has seen and assures that by asking questions, “Reader did you ever hate? I hope not. I never did but once; and I trust I never shall again. Somebody has called it the atmosphere of hell and I believe it so” ( Jacobs, 38). This shows how she appeals the reader motivating them to make a change. Looking to get the reader to get a deeper understanding of the barbarities witnessed during the time of slavery, Jacobs opens chapter 7 by asking, “Why does the slave ever love? Why allow the tendrils of the heart to twine around objects which may at any moment be wrenched away by the hand of violence?” (35). These questions are purposely written to have the reader focused on romantic love, so that the primary audience of white women realize that the threat of separation exists in both races and types of relationships because of the fact that slaveholders disregarded slaves’ emotions in the process of dehumanizing them. The purpose of the implement of rhetorical questions in the slave narrative is to emerge feelings from the mostly white audience in the hopes of abolishing …show more content…
Jacobs carefully emphasizes the female slave’s acceptance of the social norms in her desire to remain chaste; sexual relationships outside of marriage were simply immoral and not accepted, implying the similarities between the women in both races. As Dr.Flint’s pursuits become more severe, Jacobs is forced with the code of protection that defy who she is as a person. Curtain that Dr.Flint will not succeed at last and full of shame Linda practically begs for her female audience’s sympathy, “What I am about to relate… I wanted to keep myself pure; and under the most adverse circumstances, I tried hard to preserve my self-respect; but I was struggling alone in the powerful grasp of the demon of Slavery; and the monster proved too strong for me” (Jacobs, 51). The reality of family separation- which was going on due to Dr.Flint’s obsessiveness, - was one of the very rare topics that created a bond between Linda and the slave audience . By mentioning this, Jacobs makes the melancholic novel more get more support from white females since she is basically letting them know that woman had the same sensitivity and makes them want to provide Linda and other female slaves under the same situation with the support that society wasn’t providing them. After

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