Definition Of Virtue: Goodity, Fortitude, And Morality

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Goodness: Virtue thus came to mean, not moral goodness in itself considered, but goodness militant and triumphant. Virtue then, in its more usual sense at the present time, denotes conduct in accordance with the right, or with the fitness of things, on the part of one who has the power to do otherwise. But in this sense there are few, if any, perfectly virtuous men. There are criterions to recognize cardinal virtues: there are fitnesses and duties appertaining, first, to one's own being, nature, capacities, and needs; secondly, to his relations to his fellow-beings; thirdly, to his disposition and conduct with reference to external objects and events beyond his control; and fourthly, to his arrangement, disposal, and use of objects under his …show more content…
Thus employed, Prudence, or providence, includes all the duties of self-government and self-culture; Justice denotes all that is due to God and man, embracing piety and benevolence; Fortitude, which is but a synonym for strength, is an appropriate general name for every mode, whether’ of defiance, resistance, or endurance, in which man shows himself superior to his inevitable surroundings; and Order is extended to all subjects in which the question of duty is a question of time, place, or measure. Virtue as the qualities of manliness, strength, courage, bravery, daring, capacity, worth, potency applied to physical and intellectual excellence. Virtue is also an inherent power capable of producing certain effects, such as efficacy; active influence or capacity adequate to the production of a given effect. What, then, do we mean by morality ? Only the relations of man to man, or his relations also to a power above himself? If man does not believe in a power above himself, yet he ought be moral by your relations with other …show more content…
Genuine humility, as the experience of all time shews, is the rarest, because the hardest of virtues; the hardest, because it involves the most absolute uprooting of self from the system. No virtue has so many or so plausible counterfeits. The self—depreciation which courts praise is not humility; the indifference to praise, Which is contempt for others, is not humility; nay, the humility which secretly and half-unconsciously lauds itself in and for the very act of self-condemnation is but a spurious humility, like the cynic’s pride thinly veiled under his ostentatious tatters. Nowhere is the involuntary homage which vice pays to virtue more strikingly exemplified than by these semblances of humility, which pass current in the world, so as almost to defy

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