Reality Television Definition

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Encyclopedic Dictionary of Media 's definition of Reality Television: Within television there are more than just one category of reality TV, with some testing the abilities of the human body through shows like American Ninja Warrior as well as reality shows that enforce people to live together and cause drama on camera, an example being Big Brother. Reality television is a huge genre that contains hundreds of different ideas and focuses that cannot really be described by a definition. These categories of reality all have different premises yet essentially scrutinize participants as they embark within their not so private lives. The Encyclopedic Dictionary of Media’s definition of Reality television does not incorporate the types of people within …show more content…
The use of an individual’s persona is considered to not be illegal and therefore allows companies to purchase and sell fame in order to get the right cast and persona for their show. Along with fame being a commodity, “publicity rights” also plays a big part in the process, essentially when a celebrity accepts the offer of giving their personality to someone else. These concepts coincide and enforce a system that places a market on fame, with people who gain publicity in the reality television genre to brand themselves and use their image to gain more fame and money in the …show more content…
They use their appearance to try and gain fame, with Hearn saying, “…they are pre-set, freeze-dried presentations of self, molded by prior knowledge of the dictates of the reality television genre and deployed strategically to garner attention and potentially, profit” (620). Describing how one must idolize themselves through their pre made stories in order to try and gain attention and therefore be placed into the television system of being picked for their personality and make a career out of it. To continue, Hearn relates conforming to the television industry to that of wearing mickey ears at Disneyland, the participant needs to adopt a persona in order to truly partake in the reality television experience, whether that be the jerk, the loser, or the funny guy of a show. An example of the spectacularization of the self is Pawn Stars, each persona in the show is clearly identifiable, enforcing the image of each character to stick out and be unique. For example, Rick Harrison always has to act like he is the best in the business because that is what draws attention to him, as his son Chumlee goofs offs and does unordinary things because that is what the audience enjoys and he must continue his persona in order to keep selling himself in

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