Definition Of Ethics In Criminal Justice

1698 Words 7 Pages
Ethical decisions are a part of our everyday life and even more so a part of the criminal justice profession. Except for a few other professions being under the microscope of the public about the decisions made, the field of criminal justice faces this every day. Ethics are instilled in us at an early age and are very vulnerable to outside distractions that can lead us array. That’s why it is important to have a reliable moral compass that deters us from doing the wrong thing ever. There is a simple definition for ethics that Ethics, which only says it is doing the right thing when no one is looking. This definition of this term might be simple and not anything mind blowing, but it is true if we all think about it for any length of the period. …show more content…
Often people will see that you have the justice system on one side and the public on the other each with their own agendas. The insiders who run the criminal justice system - judges, police, and especially prosecutors - have information, power, and self-interests that significantly influence the criminal justice system 's process and outcomes. Outsiders - crime victims, bystanders, and most of the general public - find the system frustratingly opaque, insular, and unconcerned with proper retribution ( Bibas, 2006). This is why being transparent only helps bridge the gaps in perceived notions about how each other acts and why they do certain things in cases. It is imperative that transparency be in all departments to not allow discord among the police and the people they are charged to protect. To better exampling this I will proved two examples of two police chiefs offer transparency to the citizens. Not, saying one is better than the other, for each had their reasons for their actions, but one will look to bridge people rather than push people …show more content…
In criminal justice programs, professionals and students must study issues of considerable complexity in their moral, legal, and practical interplay (FELKENES, 1987). This is a true statement for students in the criminal justice field and officers entering their training. We all must know and understand very complex issues that are ethical in nature. Also, we must be willing to communicate that to the general public in a way that they can understand. Communication is key to transparency and sound ethics. They are learned skills and traits and must do so we have a much more efficient criminal justice system in the coming

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