Death And Violence In Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet

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Extensively considered as the Magnum Opus of Shakespeare’s enthralling work, Romeo and Juliet is intrinsic to the collection of the greatest literary works in the history of literature itself. A veritably true account of a tragedy, Romeo and Juliet is a play concerning the ill-fated tale of love between two hapless, star-crossed teenagers, with their love curtailed by the incessant blood feud between their families. Romeo and Juliet’s ardent advocates for love engenders a series of profoundly dire events, which ultimately expedites their ineluctable demise at their own hands. The intricate conceptions on the abstracts of death and violence throughout Romeo and Juliet are engendered by both the impulsive passionate hate and love that are actually …show more content…
It is signified in Act 3 Scene 1 in which Romeo engages in a clash of rapiers with Tybalt, who had just slain Mercutio. The initial violence ensued from this confrontation is mainly stemmed from Tybalt’s deep-rooted hate for the Montagues and anyone associated with them. Tybalt gets embroiled in a heated altercation with Mercutio, inevitably they duel, resulting in the death of Mercutio. Romeo and Mercutio both shared a mutual platonic love towards each other, they were akin to being brothers. It is through this passionate brotherly love for Mercutio that induced and evoking Romeo’s inner aversion, or hatred for Tybalt. This prompts Romeo to challenge Tybalt to a duel, pointing out that “Tybalt, take the “villain” back again, That late thou gavest me, for Mercutio’s soul, Is but a little way above our heads, Staying for thine to keep him company. Either thou or I, or both, must go with him.”. An enraged Romeo lashes out in enmity and kills Tybalt avenging Mercutio’s death. Thus, from this aspect of the play, it is pinpointed that love can cause an ardent hate which only led unto more and more gratuitous violence. A further insight into this violent confrontation is also explicable by Romeo’s link between hatred and his impulsiveness. He hastily kills off Tybalt in a fit of rage without contemplating the …show more content…
It is the instigator of their passionate love that ultimately leads to violence and their eventual death. That is their fatal flaw or hamartia. Romeo and Juliet’s ‘love’ was just an infatuation, they misunderstood physical attraction as being a genuine love, conceptualizing the idea of love for each other as a coping mechanism, as they were caught up in between a rock and a hard place. Basically, their supposed ‘love’, was actually a delusional fantasy of escaping their lamentable realities by being together; Romeo using Juliet as a rebound to get over Rosaline, and Juliet choosing Romeo to avoid marrying Paris, who she perceives as being undesirable. They are so attracted to the idea of being in love as a means to escape the predicaments of their lives, that they vehemently start to believe that it is actual passionate love. In Act 5 scene 3, Romeo erringly deduced that Juliet was dead. He was tremendously distraught and doleful, stating suicidally that “I still will stay with thee, And never from this palace of dim night Depart again. Here, here will I remain With worms that are thy chambermaids. Oh, here Will I set up my everlasting rest”. After he took the poison and killed himself, Juliet wakes up, only to grasp the forlorn truth that Romeo was dead. As the truth dawned on her, she

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