Deaf And Hearing Culture

1454 Words 6 Pages
One of the hottest debates between Deaf and Hearing culture lies in the question, “Should I give my deaf child a cochlear implant?” People of the Deaf culture often fear that use of cochlear implants will eliminate their culture. Yet, a hearing person may believe it will allow their child to participate in mainstream schooling and activities. Some hearing people may not want to learn sign language in order to communicate with their deaf child. As about 90% of hearing parents cannot effectively communicate with their deaf children (Holcomb, n.d., para. 2), the latter is evident. Placed in this situation, I would implant my infant child with a cochlear implant, and I would teach the child both spoken and sign language. By teaching my Deaf child …show more content…
In another study, 108 preschool-aged (three to five years old) deaf (with a cochlear implant) and hard of hearing children were administered standardized tests to test their Phonological Awareness abilities. Phonological Awareness is the ability to ability to hear and differentiate sounds (Webb & Lederberg, 2014, para. 2), and it also includes the ability to recognize, add, take apart, and move around sounds. Over one-half of the children in the study had a cochlear implant. All of the 108 children had some functional hearing, and they also attended hard of hearing classes, therefore the test subjects remain valid. When they were administered the Phonological Awareness Test 2 (PAT-2) and Test of Preschool Early Literacy-Phonological Awareness test (TOPEL-PA), the Deaf and Hard of Hearing children scored within one standard deviation below the average typical score of hearing children. In simpler terms, at least one-half of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing children scored within the normal clinical range of hearing children. This result is consistent with smaller samples of Deaf and Hard of Hearing children that possess cochlear implants (Webb & Lederberg, 2014, para. 37). The Phonological Awareness scores demonstrate that many Deaf and Hard of hearing children are on track with their peers on the terms of their speech development and …show more content…
Cochlear implants do not deliver the high-quality sound of a natural hearing ear. Recently, Professor Michael Dorman of Arizona State University discovered, from one of his patients that had both normal hearing and hearing from a cochlear implant, what cochlear implants sound like. According to audio recordings of his results, a person hearing via a cochlear implant hears speech that is echoed, slightly robotic, and of somewhat lower quality than natural hearing (Griffiths, 2014, para. 7). Nonetheless, the speech presented from the implant was mostly clear and understandable. Since cochlear implants only provide a good, but not outstanding, audio quality and some sounds can be difficult to understand, a deaf child may need to fall back on sign language, which is fully accessible to them (Klaudia, 2013, para. 17). Sign Language wdill not hinder a deaf child’s development, as a study on deaf children in Spain suggests. At the University of Córdoba in Córdoba, Spain, a group of eighteen deaf children with cochlear implants were compared, as some were bilingual (they knew both spoken and signed language) and some only knew spoken language. The children who were bilingual performed better at verbal fluency (Herruzo, Jimenez, & Pino, 2009, para. 4). In other words, the bilingual children that had cochlear implants are able to use a greater number of words in spoken

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