David Hume's Argument On Causality And Existuality

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Throughout the history of philosophy and the search for wisdom in life there are moments where reasoning leads the self to a path that one cannot fully give oneself to. Here is, in a sense, the crux of an internal existential conflict. In these times people typically would choose between two equally difficult decisions, either to side with pure reason and have that solely guide oneself through life, even if it means that one no longer believes that anything else in existence truly exists without doubt or even that one is completely alone. Or, one can choose to suspend or ignore one’s reasoning in favor of accepting one’s place as a person among persons with free will and reality both out of mind. While it seems as if these are simply the two …show more content…
Much of his influence on philosophy is that what we view as causal relation is in the mind, not in the related things themselves, and furthermore that since the causal relation people view is based upon perception and perception can be flawed, causality is flawed (Butler, 177-178). His idea of rational skepticism goes about to the point of solipsism where, since everything one encounters in life is through the senses which can be fooled, anything encountered cannot be known to truly exist. As such, the only thing in one’s reality that is not encountered is the self, thus it is the only thing one can truly know to exist. As Hume himself wrote “We may, therefore, conclude with certainty, that the opinion of a continued and of a distinct existence never arises from the senses” (Treatise, 1.4.2.11). This metaphysics, or even this filter through which one approaches life is purely philosophical, based on rationality and logic. Thus, it is one side of the proverbial …show more content…
The Treatise of Human Nature involves topics of morality, justice, passions, and virtues, all things which are about people. While it is possible, supposedly, that one could write about all these topics simply by viewing the self, but they would be limited, one-sided. To involve other possible entities, such as other people, one would have to at least temporarily believe that those entities are real. Otherwise, if one based one’s metaphysical philosophical beliefs on things that may or may not exist is shaky ground at best. Thus, even if it is temporary, it would seem that Hume abandons at least a portion of his skepticism and doubts in favor of writing on morality much like many other philosophers of the time (Russell, 672). To do so is possibly a step in evaluating the self, and addressing one’s perceived involvement in the quality of being a part of

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