Dark Romanticism In American Literature

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SER for American Writers: Romantics, Transcendentalists, and Dark Romantics and Slaves Now well into the nineteenth century, truly American literature was beginning to take its hold on society. Just as America changed drastically since its initial formation, literature within America also adapted wildly from its debut. The writing in America began to leave the constant tradition of nonfiction journal entries, and it adapted into the fiction stories and tales that are more familiar in today’s atmosphere. However, these works of fiction were still able to convey the mood of the time period as literature had done in the past. These moods can be found in the book The Norton Anthology American Literature: 1820 - 1865. This feat in establishing …show more content…
This can be shown in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s writing of, “… the real Beatrice was a heavenly angel. Incapable … he was of such faith…” (Hawthorne 1349). Hawthorne appeared to have a stance that differed from traditional religion of the time and further showed sin in dark romantic writing through his character’s refusal of religion. This also falls in line with the concept that people are naturally bad so they do not accept religion. Dark romantics focused more on what motivated individuals to do certain tasks, and in this character’s case, it was lust. This would also become true for many real relationships of the …show more content…
Fredrick Douglass recalls, “… Mr. Covey gave me a serve whipping, cutting my back, causing the blood to run, and raising ridges on my flesh as large as my little finger” (Douglass 2097). It is of no surprise to anyone that slaves were treated extremely cruelly during this time preceding the Civil War. This social custom of racism and labor was all many slaves ever were able to experience as they often died as a result of the two. Slaves were nothing more than objects to most masters during this time. Douglass himself became free of the bonds of slavery and became one of the nation’s best abolitionists. Abolitionists sought to end the social customs of the African American peoples in the nineteenth century; however, this feat would not be accomplished completely as, shamefully, racism still persists

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