Dante, S Journey In Dante's The Divine Comedy

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In 1302 Dante Alighieri is banished from Florence, the city of his birth, after backing the losing side, an opposing family, during conflicts and civil unrest as well as other for other political reasons. It 's during his banishment and left wandering around the Italian countryside that he composes his most well known work of literature, The Divine Comedy, an epic poem. In the first volume of poem, Inferno, Dante still finds himself as a wanderer but now wandering through a different landscape. Slowly but steadily, guided by the Roman poet Virgil, Dante begins wandering physically down the steep descent into Hell or "Inferno" as the title of his first poem suggests. The journey in Dante 's poem is much more than just his physical journey into …show more content…
Dante Alighieri wrote his poem, The Divine Comedy, near the middle of his life, a time where Dante might have been questioning his morality and his afterlife. A time in their life when any medieval Christian would begin to question their life, morality, and impending afterlife. He alludes to finding himself "...within a forest dark / For the straightforward pathway had been lost", the path blurred between enlightenment (the straightforward path) and damnation (forest dark). Dante 's use of "our life" shows us that he acknowledges his journey is not unique to his own self. That this a journey that everyone, or every Christian at the time, must have take into consideration. This struggle (journey) of finding grace and enlightenment (the straightforward path) in way of damnation and sin (forest dark). And even though he fears Hell, Dante knows he must endure the path through it to reach Heaven. Much like how medieval Christians would have to had struggled by facing sin daily to reach enlightenment under the watchful eye of …show more content…
An early sense of humility shown by Dante for the souls are those dammed in Limbo, the First Circle of Hell. It is within The First Circle of Hell that the non-virtuous Christians and unbaptized reside. The greatest non-Christians (mainly Roman artists, poets, politicians, scientists, etc.) according to Dante reside here in this circle and Virgil explains "...they have not sinned / ...they did not know baptism / Which is the gateway to the faith you follow..." and their punishment, as explained, is that they are lost "In this alone we suffer... / ...we live on in desire" (98). In this realm the dammed are condemned to an inferior version of Heaven essentially. A lot of those residing in this level of Hell simply just didn 't have the chance to "know" God. Most were born before the birth of Christianity or in the case of unbaptized babies and children, they were too young to commit a personal sin but still are born with original sin. If you were in Limbo you were given a sort of veiled mercy. Ultimately, it 's an act of humility and sympathy by God that those who reside here suffer no physical torment like every other level, but they must live in desire with no hope of seeing or knowing God as their

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