Cysticercosis Case Study

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Cysticercosis is characterized as a parasitic infection caused by the larval stage of Taenia solium. The infection of cystistercus in swine is known as porcine cysticercosis; the infection of cystistercus in humans is known as human cysticercosis. The transmission of this zoonosis disease occurs through the ingestion of T. solium eggs that has been passed from tapeworm-infested fecal matter from humans. Humans and pigs, also known as the intermediate hosts for this parasitic species, can develop cysticercosis if proglottids are ingested. Once the eggs are hatched, they become an onchospheres that penetrates the intestinal wall allowing the cysticercus to form in different organs throughout the body. Cysticercosis is primarily found in low-social …show more content…
Based on the reports from neighboring countries around the DCR, neurocysticercosis (NCC) and cerebral cysticercosis (CC) are clearly prevalent in their countries. However, in the DCR, the last reported case of human and porcine cysticercosis was reported in 1958 and 1990. According to the article, the negligence of this endemic was due to economic challenges in which the country underwent during two decades of war and conflict (). The accumulated debt the DCR collected affected the government’s priorities on public health issues. More emphasis was placed towards major diseases such as HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis in comparison to NTIs such as cysticercosis. This research investigation was a crucial to the DCR because it was the first initiative to evaluate the economic and public health consequences of …show more content…
In these villages, the pigs were traditionally reared. The selection of the villages was based on the willingness to participate in the study, and whether or not the villages presented major risk factors that would increase pigs transmission of T. solium. The idealistic village they targeted lacked latrines, had free-roaming pigs and had poor hygienic conditions (). To eliminate bias, all of the villages selected shared similar cultural, commercial, and social-economic conditions. From this study, 153 pigs from the Bas-Congo villages were blood sampled. Among this population, approximately 5.5 % of the pigs tested positive for tongue cysticercosis. There was no significant difference between the percentage positives between the five villages, but the prevalence of active cysticercosis was about 41.2% for free-roaming

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