Cyprus Crisis Case Study

Improved Essays
Canada’s determination to be internationally present as a middle power emerged following the Second World War. At this time. Canada also began develop a reputation as a peace-keeper for the international community, as policy makers felt is was integral for Canada’s reputation. During this period Canadian citizens also felt that peacekeeping was an important part of the Canadian identity. While the Canadian government was under Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King, Canadian foreign policy had a disputed isolationist approach to foreign policy. However, when Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent succeeded the Canadian government, foreign policy experienced a shift, switching to an internationalist approach. This was exemplified by Canada’s involvement …show more content…
Firstly, to maintain the reputation of a peacekeeping nation in the international community. Secondly, the Cyprus Crisis became an issue another issue of the Cold War. As a result Western governments became concerned about the possibility that the Soviet Union of the issue of the Cyprus Crisis. The countries involved in the crisis acted as a major contributor as to why Canada was involved in the peacekeeping forces. Due to the fact that countries involved were members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Canada realistically had little say in their involvement. Furthermore, as Canada had setup a reputation for itself as a peacekeeper in recent events surrounding the Cold War, such as the Suez Canal Crisis, as well as the Korean War, Canada was sought out by the United Nations as a contributor to the peacekeeping mission. Neglecting to participate in the Cyprus Crisis would have tarnished Canada’s reputation as a powerful force in peacekeeping in the international community. While Canada did technically have the choice as to whether or not to participate, their contribution to peacekeeping efforts in Cyprus were …show more content…
Furthermore, Canadian’s have felt as though Canada’s reputation as a peacekeeper was a characteristic of the Canadian identity. An overwhelming amount of the Canadian population, 90 percent, believe that Canada should provide troops for peacekeeping upon United Nations request. The value of peacekeeping to the Canadian population was reflected in Canada’s foreign polices. Uniquely, Canadian participation in the Cyprus Crisis was approved by all parties in the House of Commons. While various parties had different takes on how the peacekeeping mission should be conducted, it was approved by all. The conservatives, who were less enthusiastic about involvement in external affairs then the Liberals, who were in power in 1964, were naturally more hesitant about Canadian involvement. Their hesitation was rooted in the fact that felt that peacekeepers were not adequately armed for the conflict they were dealing with. The Canadian conservatives were not the only ones concerned about the lack of arms. Duncan Sandys, a member of British parliament also voiced similar opinions regarding the lack action peacekeepers were enabled to take against

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