Analysis Of Custer Died For Your Sins By Vine Deloria Jr.

Superior Essays
The only way to truly understand someone is when you have gone through what this person has gone through. In Custer Died for Your Sins, Vine Deloria Jr. says “Anyone and everyone who knows an Indian or who is interested, immediately and thoroughly understands them.” White people believed that Indians are so easy to read and so understandable, meanwhile they have no idea what difficulties and struggles they went through. The Indians got stereotyped for being something that isn’t true and their beliefs were mistaken for something else. Another issue presented was the unfair treatment of the government policies against the Indians. Finally, the Indians were being taken away from something that clearly belonged to them for a long time which was …show more content…
After everything they put the Indians through, they decided to remove them entirely from the eastern United States; this was called the Indian Removal Act. The federal laws supported and agreed to remove the Indians from their own land. The Indian Trade and Intercourse Act of 1834 and the United States army forced the Native Americans west of the Mississippi. The Indians in their tribal lands were decreasing slowly over the years because of this act. Deloria believes that Congress wanted Indians to act like “white farmers” but they failed. Congress wanted only white farmers to live in the areas of the Native Americans so they pushed them out. Because of this act, the government now has full power over the lives and property of the Indian …show more content…
The United States Army was involved as well. The soldiers and state militia forced the Indians out of their area by taking away the land that their own and turning them into camps for the army. They stole everything that they owned from their homes. They also burned down their farm land area and their food so that they have no reason to return. Two hundred thousand Native Americans were marching for one thousand miles to Oklahoma throughout the seasons. The weather conditions were very harsh at times, especially in the winter. It took them eight years to finally reach their destination. They had very little food, clothes and medical care therefore many elderly and children died before they can get to

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    out west. For example, on page 81 in the American History: Reconstruction to the Present textbook, Sitting Bull, a Sioux chief says, “‘We did not give our country to you; you stole it. You come here to tell lies; when you go home, take them with you.’” This powerful quote from the text portrays how Native Americans were stripped of their rights because as Sitting Bull said, the U.S. was taking their country and their land away from them. Similar to losing their rights, a copious amount of Native Americans were being assimilated during this time. Assimilation is the process of blending two cultures together.…

    • 1077 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    An example of conflict between the two groups of inhabitants is when the tribe of Kiowas were forced to go to a reservation. They resolved to abandon the reservation and fought the white hunters who were destroying the buffalo. Unfortunately, they were overpowered. Some tribes went back to the reservation, while others hunted buffalo at Palo Duro Canyon, the last remaining range. Ultimately, the Army destroyed their village and forced the Kiowas to surrender.…

    • 719 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    What was the Trail of Tears? The Trail of Tears was the beginning of the end for the Native Americans. The conflict started back in the 1800s when white people began to settle in the Native American territory leaving them with nothing in the end. People who settled on the western frontier feared the Natives and their savage ways. The Natives wanted nothing to do with the settlers and the settlers wanted the land they thought they were duly entitled to.…

    • 1070 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Even after all that suffering, the White Man thought it was a good idea to force Indians to adopt their culture and become civilized, as if they hadn 't already taken enough. They tried to force upon them the new religion of Christianity, the English language and white dress and hairstyles. However, in the 1930s, the federal government tried to reverse this but the damage had already been done. "In 1887, the United States Congress passed the Dawes Severalty Act as a concerted effort to break up large reservation holdings that bond Native Americans to their tribes." (pg.433) The plan did not really work out and Native Americans ended up losing 60 percent of their lands.…

    • 706 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The laws enforced by the U.S. government had prohibited the Indians from continuing their way of life. In “Ghost Dance of 1890, the: Implications for the Wounded Knee Massacre”, there is a good description of this. It states, “In a remarkably short period of time the Native American had to surrender most of his customs on which the old life had focused. Warfare was an activity no longer possible, therefore the principle means of attaining prestige, wealth, and high rank vanished the moment they arrived at the reservations... Politically the Indian had to adopt the white man’s ways.…

    • 859 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    On December 29, 1890, the United States’ Seventh Cavalry surrounded a camp of Sioux Indians at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. According to eyewitness to history, Massacre at Wounded Knee, 1890, the Cavalry’s mission was to arrest the Miniconjou Lakota’s chief, Big Foot, and disarm his warriors, because of their involvement in the Ghost Dance Movement. The conflict quickly arose, as a result of the tension that had been building up between the two sides for the past few months. During a search for weapons among the Sioux people, one shot was fired, which quickly lead to a violent outburst between the U.S. Army and the Sioux. The battle, which was typically one-sided due to the dominance of the Seventh Cavalry, resulted in…

    • 1271 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Native Americans

    • 841 Words
    • 4 Pages

    In the early-mid 1800s, the United States Indian office began to physically remove Natives from their land and force them to assimilate them into white culture. Some tribes moved, but some refused. This prompted Andrew Jackson to convince Congress to pass the Indian Removal Act in 1830, forcing almost all the Native tribes still east of the Mississippi River to leave their homes and travel west. When they were relocated to the Indian Territory, they had to learn to live with the other tribes who were already there. Missionaries and…

    • 841 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In this article it talks about how The Board of Indian Commissioners made up The Dawes Act to break up the reservations to make the Indians more civilized. They broke up the land to 160 acres for each head of family; which then made Native Americans landowner citizens of the United States. Here is the catch though, if an Indian was not seen as a citizen they had to contest in the U.S courts and they usually lost their lands. In the article it says, The Dawes Act caused nearly 65% of Indian landholdings disappeared. The Board believed that the barbaric Indians couldn’t live next to the civilized American, so they had to change them.…

    • 1245 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Indian Removal Act DBQ

    • 1334 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The goal of allowing all people to be ruled by the laws of the country was evidently a failure. To further show this, Indian Removal Act shows the extent at which the goal was forgotten. Established under the Jackson administration in 1830, the Indian Removal Act enacted the government 's financial aid in the uprooting of the “Five civilized tribes”- Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole. Previously, tribes like the Cherokee attempted to assimilate to the Western life by forming schools, and even adopted the nation’s government model. The government believed that the Indian Removal was a way of saving Indians and their culture from western settlers and their influences.…

    • 1334 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    As a result of his actions, thousands of Indians were forcibly ripped from their homes and onto a journey to a unknown territory, that was not as fertile as their home grounds. This law triggered the mass genocide of Indians in the United States. The Indian Removal Act was unjustifiable due to the natives creation of a civilized…

    • 2378 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Superior Essays