Cultural Identity: A Conceptual Analysis

883 Words 4 Pages
Cultural identity is usually inferred on the basis of one’s sense of the act and the stance meanings. Of course, although some acts and stances are closely associated with particular cultural identities, other acts and stances are resources for constructing a wide range of cultural identities. The action is represented by touching, reaching, manipulating, and transforming not only ways of knowing objects, but also fundamental conceptual dimensions of cultural objects (Ochs 1993). It is translated as cultural knowledge, as Seo & Gao (2015) idea, that suggests people understand their uniqueness personalities as a person and a member of community; however, in case of human objects, culture can be interact each other if they have a willingness …show more content…
It describes the nature of relationships between people and their environment, and amongst people themselves because they also make choices about who to interact with. Individuals value socio-cultural interaction because it can provide information, economic opportunities, economic support, risk sharing, or can simply be enjoyable (Reich 2013). However, those were made some suggestions about central themes in the conceptualization of place. Inglis (n.d.) mentioned that categorization with the place is a form of socio-cultural labeling as much as identification. The place is seen in terms of people gathered together in a particular location, territory and space which creates particular forms of social dependence and interaction. Indeed, Corcoran and her college (as cited in Inglis n.d.) were concluded that socio-cultural interaction had a strong sense of identification with where they lived. Hence, multicultural interaction is identified by two indicators that are socio-cultural and spatial to find multicultural …show more content…
Moreover, Chandler and Lalonde (as cited in Kirmayer et al. 2009) found that indicators of greater cultural continuity in the community were associated with its cultural competence. They define cultural continuity as a workable personal or collective mechanism that reinforces responsible ownership of a past and hopeful commitment to the future. For instance, in some communities success follows from renewing culture, while for others, priorities of traditional image and education are more prominent. Collective means of preserving identity are linked to an individual process of coherence and continuity; both levels serve to mitigate its

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