Cultural Diversity In Schools Essay

1026 Words 4 Pages
Ethnicity in Australian schools arises from the global movement of people from diverse ethnic, cultural and socio-economic backgrounds. The reasons for movement vary from expatriation, refugee status, and asylum seeking, or people seeking better working and living conditions. As people move and settle in a new country, adjusting into a new environment has its challenges as they experience a change in a sense of place especially immigrants or refugees who are in detention centres for indefinite periods of time, or have temporary visas. Others experience change in a sense of identity, which is always tied to a person 's ethnic and cultural life, (Lawrence et al, 2012, p.78). As Hedges, (2012) purports, students from diverse cultures create multiple …show more content…
In the scenario provided, Marika’s “tourist curriculum,” (Goldman, 2011, paragraph 4) which denotes (teaching children about cultures through celebrations and artefacts such as food or clothing), left no deeper understanding of cultural diversity based on the comment made about boat people. Food day neither increased the students’ awareness of cultural difference nor did it evoke empathy with displaced students. A Venezuelan student in the YouTube video: "Because I’m Latino, I can’t have money?" Kids on Race, is evidence that holding food days as a symbol of cultural awareness is ineffective. Cultural diversity is more than food and clothing - the outward display of difference. In Hall, (1976)’s analogy of visible and hidden culture, food is at the tip of the iceberg. There are underlying, deep-rooted cultural traits that are less changeable encompassing values, attitudes and beliefs. Other cultural variables include non-verbal communication, worldviews and frames of reference. It is critical to understand these cultural concepts for each culture represented in the class to create cultural harmony among …show more content…
They learn things that teachers do not intend them to learn through experiences in the playground and through activities they engage in before and after school. Through this hidden curriculum, (Blaise & Nuttal, 2004, p.90), children learn how educators and other students perceive them. They pick up stereotypical knowledge and understanding from their environment and try to make their own meanings from the experiences. Children need a lot of adult guidance to appreciate the views and feelings of others. Teachers must act as role models and address issues as they arise. Children base their concept of right or wrong according to what adults around them are saying and doing; they take adult behaviour as cues for social expectations and norms. If teachers model empathy, respect, and care for all students, children will emulate such

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