Ethnic Diversity In Australia

Great Essays
The development of Australia’s culture and ethnic diversity from 1945 to the present time has been primarily been shaped by the revolution of official government migration policies. The changes in policies allowed waves of many different migrants from all around the world to re settle in Australia. The end of World War II marked a turning point in Australia’s views of migration as Australia thought necessary they make an impact in the new world order. Since then migration policies of cultural discrimination such as the ‘White Australia Policy’ and the ‘Ten Pound Pom’ have been abolished in the making of modern Australia.

European immigration
Australia set out on an aspiring 'populate or perish ' plan to welcome immigration after the war.
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Australia signed the 1967 Protocol in 1973 that enlarged the geographical scope of refugee resettlement beyond Europe with the United Nations Refugee Convention.The newly founded encouragement of non european migrants to Australia provided a safe haven for many Vietnamese escaping the Vietnam War, and millions of Cambodians escaping the brutal Khmer Rouge regime in 1975. Most of these refugees first sought asylum in countries that were close to them but as these countries began to run out of resources, humanitarian assistance was desperately needed. Between 1945 and 1976, 1.5 million migrants were born in places other than Britain. The Department of Immigration resettled around 95,000 Indochinese refugees in Australia between the years of 1975 and 1985. Refugees from the former Yugoslavia, East Timor and El Salvador were also given refugee in Australia during the 1980s and 1990s. Australia joined the Comprehensive Plan of Action in 1989, coordinating an international response to persistent outflows of refugees from Vietnam and South-East Asia. Since then Australia has been a part in assisting refugees from various war-torn areas of the world along with gaining popularity to people seeking more economical wealth. By the end of the 1980s, Australia’s population had rose substantially and reached just more than 17 million in 1990. More recent arrivals of refugees from Northern and Central Africa, the Middle East, Burma and Sri Lanka have caused significant changes in Australia’s immigration policies. In 1992, the Prime Minister Paul Keating introduced a change of policy, with ‘mandatory detention for all people arriving in Australia without a valid visa’. This caused controversial issues between Australians in support of refugees and Australians who agreed with the policy. In 2001, John Howard 's Government denies permission for a Norwegian ship to enter its waters

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