Cultural Differences In The Kurh

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Introduction For any ethnic group in the world, it can be explained that the ethnic group has to have its specific identity that is normally founded on a common race, geographical region, and even religion among others. This paper focuses on the Kurdish-Turkish identity as well as the politics and conflicts related to the Kurdish-Turkish relationship. The Kurds who are reported to be over 35 million and commonly discussed as a nation that does not have any state (McDowall, 1997). As explained by McDowall, the homeland of the Kurds happens to neighbor Syria, Turkey, Iran, and Iraq and as a result, the various governments in the four different countries relates differently with the Kurds. According to historian William Westermann (1991), “The …show more content…
The Kurds are ethnically and culturally different from both the Turks and the Iraqis. They speak a different language which is Kurdish, and while all three cultures are mostly Muslims, they all practice Islam in a slightly different way due to different school of thoughts. The Kurds have used this cultural difference as a cause to establish a homeland. However, the Turks and Iraqis observe the dissimilarities in culture and ethnicity in a much different logic. “Turkey has tried to obliterate the very existence of the Kurds by assimilating them, claiming they were just ‘Mountain Turks’, and legally banning their language, culture, and geographical place names, among numerous other tactics” (Ibrahim and Gürbey, 2000). It is well known that ‘non- Turkish’ religious or ethnic groups were considered as a probable threat to the Turkish state. This was also a problem in Iraq. Saddam Hussein considered the Kurds a problem in Iraq and saw them as a threat to the glory of Arabs. His scorn of the Kurds led to the massacre of at least 5,000 Kurdish civilians in the Halabja Chemical Attacks of 1988 (Vasudevan and Alam, …show more content…
Nevertheless, the feudalist aspirations of the leadership resulted to a split in SPK as some leaders supported secession while other supported autonomous. The opposing views on what was best for the Kurds meant that the Kurds found it hard to make progress with their demands. Indeed, it can be explained that Kurds found it a challenge to match the efficiently organized and operated nationalist objectives of their Turkish neighbors. As a matter of fact, it can be noted that the conscientiously inspired Kurdish feudalism did not only result to weaknesses and irresponsibility of the Kurdish nationalism, but as well ended up been a catastrophic catalyst for Kurdish intellectuals. The disillusionment of certain Kurdish intellectuals as well as those who were secular nationalists meant that the opponents had a upper hand (Marcus,

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