Japanese Culture Diversity

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This document will describe two minority cultural populations living within Washington State, Japanese and Hispanic or Latino, embracing three conventional characteristics, family, arts, and holidays; in addition to similarities and differences, finally, application in the classroom.
Japanese
Japanese culture is abundant and diverse, dating back to 10,000BC when the Jomon immigrate originally colonized in Japan; it is universally recognized for its traditional arts in addition to its contemporary pop culture.
Asian lineages consist of the Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Cambodian, and Indonesian descendants. There is significant diversity amongst and surrounding the group’s history, language, and demographic including, education, population, income, religion, and occupation. (Ethnic Variation/Ethnicity - Asian Families, n.d.)
Family
Familiarity of a culture 's family orderliness is prerequisite to appreciation of a society; in the instance of Japan, it is particularly significant since the family, rather than the individual, is considered to be the fundamental component of the culture. According to Japan Powered, (2014), Japan, like China and Korea, is profoundly subjective by Confucian ideals; a civilization concentrating on the family. Customarily gender responsibilities in Japan are distinguished by a concentrated
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The timeliest complex art is connected with the increase of Buddhism in the seventh and eighth centuries C.E. The virtuosities were supported for centuries by a sequence of royal courts and noble clans, until development generated a general market. Mutually spiritual and nonspiritual creative customs were established with Buddhist and Confucian artistic ideologies, especially the Zen conception that every characteristic of the physical world is parcel of a comprehensive entity. (New World Encyclopedia,

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