Cultural Differences In Corporate And Institutional Organizations

753 Words 4 Pages
In corporate and institutional organizations, strategic decisions commonly hinge on the product of quantitatively researching empirical, observable phenomena such as market penetration data, financial statements, or demographic studies. These types of data are rather straightforward and analyzed, synthesized, or summarized to deliver easily comprehended information ranging from profitability ratios to market share and anything in between. However, one category often belies and betrays the best of minds; it is qualitative phenomena. Qualitative phenomena can be incredibly difficult to measure as they deal with abstract realities such as behavior and perceptions to say nothing of identifying their actual existence. Of all qualitative phenomena …show more content…
On the other hand, ignoring the cultural component can be quite costly, if not devastating, for any organization. Imagine a major deployment or product launch met with an embarrassing and consequent backlash resulting in the effectual elimination from future efforts in the long run. At the same time there is an internal aspect to organizations commonly referred to as the company or corporate culture that possess a special significance. And although they generally share similar characteristics to the surrounding society in which a company operates, it adds a unique accretion of organizational philosophy, values, and policies. Corporate cultures tend to run deep and have historically undermined several famous mergers and acquisitions over the years to the point of demonstrative failure. Furthermore, these phenomena are especially relevant to new employees where they can produce an undertow metaphorically pulling one to the bottom while damaging or destroying a …show more content…
In fact many organizations periodically cost-justify their entire inventory of the professional positions as part of personnel planning efforts. Given these points, exactly what might this signify to a prospect? Firstly, a candidate presumably possesses commensurate and substantive skill sets as an unconditional requisite; those responsibilities naturally fall into the lap of the candidate. Secondly, a candidate should always perform an extensive inquiry of the organization to ascertain a strong feel for its financial stability and those powerful intangibles conspicuously difficult to measure. And of those, none will be as abstruse, significant, or potentially jeopardizing to a career and day-to-day quality of life than the intangible organization culture. Therefore known friends or relationships can become extraordinarily valuable if they can provide information deemed reliable and otherwise unavailable from all other

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