Cultural Colonization In New Zealand

1458 Words 6 Pages
Since the authors who explored cultural decimation through colonization mainly analyzed the situations of native Americans, native Hawaiians, and the Maori natives of New Zealand, these case studies are incorporated in this literature review to contextualize the authorsʻ arguments. Upon collecting literature on the methods that colonizers employed to acculturate the native peoples they came into contact with, each of the authors assert that these actions were initiated by the colonizersʻ intention to improve the lifestyles of the natives. Each of the authors discuss that the colonizersʻ condemned native practices and traditions, and believed that the natives would willingly abandon their state of destitution to adopt their superior western …show more content…
As Dr. Lilikala Kameʻeleihiwa discusses in Native Land and Foreign Desires, the European settlers introduced their customs and religious practices to the native Hawaiians and condemned the culture of the natives, which convinced them that the settlers were god-like beings (Kameʻeleihiwa, 192). As a result, the settlers were able to establish their credibility among the natives, which allowed them to gain the trust of the natives and exploit them for their land and resources. According to Graham Smith, these practices were similar among the colonization of the Maori Natives and their land, as their cultural practices were also abolished by the western settlers, which instilled a sense of inferiority among the natives (Smith, ). He also explains that this colonial agenda has been sustained through oppressive structures and institutions such as the education system, which is how the westerners were able to disadvantage the natives and continue to do so today. These arguments for cultural decimation explicate the process in which colonizers were able to convince the natives to succumb to their leadership as well as how this cycle has been perpetuated over time, which the other arguments …show more content…
While some authors argue that coercion and economic development are the most effective, these assertions do not demonstrate how colonizers were able to persuade the natives to abide by their leadership as well as preserve this leadership over time, which the arguments for cultural decimation does. In concluding the research for this literature review, the main hypothesis has been developed to, If colonizers were able to successfully assimilate the natives and convince them to abandon their culture and identity, then colonization was successful because the natives viewed themselves as inferior and perpetually sought the leadership of the colonizers. Future research should be conducted to investigate the presence of these colonial practices in todayʻs society within oppressive structures and institutions that continue to marginalize native peoples. One example would be to analyze the education system to link the oppressive techniques that Dr. DeJond and Graham Smith discuss to elements of todayʻs education system that may unnoticably continue this colonial agenda. Another idea for future research would be to assess how native peoples continue to struggle protecting their land as well as government responses. Evaluating the

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