Cultural Change In The Cherry Orchard By Anton Chekhov

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The Cherry Orchard is a play written by Anton Chekhov in 1901. The play takes between May and October of the beginning of the 20th century in Russia. The story follows the Lyuba Ranevsky, her family, and servants. All of them have to deal with auctioning the house to pay for the mortgage that they have. This is symbolic to the sudden cultural change of this time period. During this turn of a century in Russia, the rise of the middle class affected the power of the aristocracy that is illustrated in this play. Although characters seem to not be affected by this in the play and they do not directly mention this, it is the direct cause of all their problems that get unfolded in The Cherry Orchard. The character that I chose to a character analysis …show more content…
This affected everyone socially. People could travel and make more money working in a factory instead of serving others, which lead to the rise of the middle class. Trofimov talks passionately about how the world is changing, this influenced Anya to be “free as the wind” and to be open to changes around her in society (46). Unlike her mother, at the end of the play Anya is ready to leave the house saying “goodbye house! Goodbye, old life” (79). Anya has a loving relationship with all of her family. Her father died about six years ago and she lost her little brother, Grisha, which she seemed to have handled it better than her mother. She states “it was too much for Mama”, leading me to believe that the reason why her family is so affectionate towards her is because of these deaths and she is the youngest and they don’t want to lose no more family members (15). She has an older sister, Varya, who is Ranevksy’s adopted daughter. Even though Varya is adopted it does not stop them being affectionate towards each other, Varya even calls Anya “my darling” (12). Varya is concerned and only wants the best for her sister such as getting Anya married because that would be “such a weight off [her] mind” (14). Since time is changing, she is open to the idea to “study hard and pass [her] exams and then…go work” (73). Even though she states this at the end of the play, earlier she says her “French is hopeless” …show more content…
She is unafraid of the changes she faces and bravely moves towards it; she is accepting of the new ideas brought to her by Trofimov. At the beginning, she shares the same thoughts as her mother, Anya is even said to be exactly like her. But over time, her opinions changed and she becomes open to different options in society. She is more than willing to study more and get a job, a thing her mother could never imagine doing. Others always describe Anya as a happy, dear girl, and I would not describe her any other way. She is young and full of curiosity. Anya at first glance seems to be a simple-minded girl who lets others influence her, but once going in depth of exploring her character I see that she is a young girl on the cusp of womanhood wanting to fit in the changing society and to not be stuck in the past such as her

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