Cuban Government Essay

1053 Words 4 Pages
The Republic of Cuba is an island country in the Caribbean that is home to over eleven million citizens. It is one of only enduring socialist states with a Communist government left in the world. The leadership regimes that dictate the island are a reflection of continuing efforts to strengthen its weak democratic system. Daily life is dependent on what the government allows, and what the government does not allow for its people. Throughout history, the dictating Cuban government shaped the principles and cultures of the densely populated area. Since the government claims to be lessening pressure on its people, the once strict political structure may experience reforms to benefit the public. However, it is seen in various cases that the Cuban …show more content…
It is surprising that less than 2% of the population is homeless, when in fact; the island is so small compared to the capacity of inhabitants. When everyone is treated equally in society based on political regimes, majority of the citizens live similar if not identical lifestyles. The employment to population ratio is 58:4. Most of the Cuban workforce is hired by the state; privatization has increased as the country begins to allow its people the right to outside jobs. The number of Cubans working in private industries, meaning not run by the state, has doubled. Farmers are allowed to sell their output to the highest bidders, rather than the state government. These are instances of the Cuban government following through with its basic ideas of developing into a more advanced country. Allowing citizens to private their professions and do other things not mandated by the state is a good start to a progressing …show more content…
The Cuban government has been accused of countless human right infringements throughout time. Cuban citizens are denied basic rights and freedoms such as speech, privacy, and basic law rights. Internet access is heavily controlled and the use of email as communication is extremely monitored. They even are subject to forms of torture, unnecessary imprisonment, unfair trials, and unlawful executions. An article in the New York Times urges congressmen to “remain focused on politics and human rights” to help “move the island away from

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